Hazard class table

If you are carrying out classification of substances and/or mixtures (chemical products) you are strongly advised to carefully go through the whole of Part 1 of the Guidance on the application of CLP criteria document.

Interpretation and guidance on the legal text on the criteria for classifying substances and mixtures for their physical, health or environmental effects is given in parts 2 to 4 of the Guidance document. It is strongly advised to use this guidance when classifying chemicals under the CLP Regulation.

The following table provides you the reference to the chapters and sections related to each hazard class in the Guidance document.

Physical hazards

In principle, the physical hazards of a mixture need to be tested and evaluated for the mixture itself. There may be cases where adequate and reliable information is already available. This is outlined in Article 8(2) CLP.

In some cases, the properties of the ingredients can be used as a basis to determine whether a given physical hazard is to be expected or not. 

When new tests for physical hazards are carried out for the purposes of classification, they must be carried out in compliance with a relevant recognised quality system or by laboratories complying with a relevant recognised standard.

Guidance on the application of CLP criteria 

 

Hazard Class Chapter in Guidance Section with guidance on mixture classification Section with examples on mixture classification Further information
Explosives 2.1 2.1.4 2.1.7  
Flammable gases 2.2 2.2.1.4 2.2.1.7  
Flammable aerosols and aerosols 2.3 not applicable not applicable  
Oxidising gases 2.4   2.4.7  
Gases under pressure 2.5   2.5.7  
Flammable liquids 2.6   2.6.7  
Flammable solids 2.7   2.7.7  
Self-reactive substance/mixture 2.8   2.8.7  
Pyrophoric liquids 2.9   2.9.7  
Pyrophoric solids 2.10   2.10.7  
Self-heating substance/mixture 2.11   2.11.7  
Water-reactive - emits flammable gases 2.12   2.12.7  
Oxidising liquids 2.13   2.13.6  
Oxidising solids 2.14   2.14.6  
Organic peroxides 2.15   2.15.7  
Corrosive to metals 2.16   2.16.7  

Health hazards

The Guidance provides simple examples on the classification of mixtures for most health hazards.

Guidance on the application of CLP criteria 

Hazard Class Chapter in Guidance Section with guidance on mixture classification Section with examples on mixture classification Further information
Acute toxicity 3.1 3.1.3 3.1.6.3  
Skin corrosion / irritation 3.2 3.2.3 3.2.6.2  
Eye damage / irritation 3.3 3.3.3 3.3.6.2  
Respiratory / skin sensitisation 3.4 3.4.3 3.4.6.1  
Mutagenicity 3.5 3.5.3    
Carcinogenicity 3.6 3.6.3    
Toxic for reproduction 3.7 3.7.3    
Specific target organ toxicity
(single exposure)
3.8 3.8.3    
Specific target organ toxicity
(repeated exposure)
3.9 3.9.3 3.9.6.3  
Aspiration hazard   not applicable not applicable To determine the classification, kinematic viscosity of the sample (substance/mixture) is measured. The viscosity of a non-Newtonian fluid is undefined because it depends on the method of measurement. See the Guidance on information requirements and chemical safety assessment - Chapter R.7a states: The measurement of non-Newtonian fluids is possible only with the rotational viscometer.

Environmental hazards

Guidance on the application of CLP criteria 

 

Hazard Class Chapter in Guidance Section with guidance on mixture classification Section with examples on mixture classification Further information
Hazardous to the aquatic
environment
4.1 4.1.4  4.1.4.7
The use of Table 4.1.6—a. of the
Guidance document is clarified in an
additional example (Example AX).
The summation method is clarified
with a figure using cylinders (Example
YY).
 
    Annex IV.5.6 Classification of mixtures of
metals and metal compounds
  Simple or regular mixtures of metals should be classified as any other mixtures. Alloys are considered to be special mixtures.

 

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