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Physical & Chemical properties

Flash point

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Description of key information

Six studies were available for this endpoint:
Merritt. M (1998a): 69 ºC
Simmons. C (2004): No ignition was observed in any test in the range of -20 to 70°C.
Rogers. G (2007): No ignition was observed in any test in the range of -20 to 70°C.
Merritt. M (1998b): Lower Flammable Limit: 3.6 % v/v, Upper Flammable Limit: 9.7 % v/v, Min. Ignition Energy of a Vapour (mJ): 75 - 90
Dahn, C.J. (1999): No ignition was observed in any test in the range of 17.2 ºC - 73.3 ºC.
Simmons. C (2005): Lower Flammable Limit: 3.6 % v/v, Upper Flammable Limit: 9.7 % v/v, Min. Ignition Energy of a Vapour (mJ): 75 - 90

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Flash point at 101 325 Pa:
69 °C

Additional information

Merritt. M (1998a) was selected as the key study on a worst case scenario basis, as this was the only study for which a definitive flash point value could be obtained under 70 ºC. The key study produced a flash point of 69 ºC.

Merritt. M (1998b) and Simmons. C (2005) determined that the flammable limits occurred between 3.6 and 9.7 % v/v with the minimum energy for ignition lying between 75 - 90 mJ.

Discussion regarding flammability classification and justification regarding why the current existing official EU flammability classification is not warranted:

A number of methods have been used in order to test the flammability of 1-bromopropane including Pensky Martins and Abel closed cup methods. These are internationally approved methods (ISO, ASTM etc.)

The pure product is >99.8% 1 -bromopropane.

The first test was carried out in 1998 on the pure product and showed a flash point of 69 °C.

In a similar test in the US (by Safety Engineering Consultants), they did not find a flash point up to 70 °C.

According to CLP Regulation classification criteria, in order for a liquid to be classified as flammable, it must have a flash point equal to or below 60 °C. Therefore, according to CLP Regulation, 1 -bromopropane should not be classified as a flammable liquid.

UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (classification for transportation):

The hazard grouping based on flammability is almost identical to the CLP Regulation criteria for flammable liquids (the only differences being no indication of a flash point for substances with an initial boiling point of <35 °C for PG I, and indication of an initial boiling point of >35 °C for PG III). Bromopropanes in general are classified for transportation under UN 2344 Class 3 PG II or PG III (depending on the flashpoint). For PG III, Special Provision 223 allows the manufacturer not to classify its product if the following applies: “If the chemical or physical properties of a substance covered by this description are such that when tested it does not meet the established defining criteria for the class or division listed in Column 3 of the Dangerous Goods List of Chapter 3.2, or any other class or division, it is not subject to these Regulations.” As indicated above, our product when tested showed a flash point above the classification criteria for PGIII. Based on SP 223, our Competent Authority confirmed that our product should not be classified for transportation.

It is noted that until such time that the Annex VI classification of the substance is altered, the official classification for substance must be applied.