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Exposure related observations in humans: other data

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
exposure-related observations in humans: other data
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Study period:
1943
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Short report only, no details available
Cross-referenceopen allclose all
Reason / purpose:
reference to same study
Reason / purpose:
reference to other study

Data source

Referenceopen allclose all

Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Sensory response to certain industrial solvent vapors
Author:
Nelson, K.W., Ege, J.F. Jr., Ross, M., Woodman, L.E., Silverman, L.
Year:
1943
Bibliographic source:
J. Ind. Hyg. Toxicol. 28 (7) 282-285
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Further studies on sensory response to certain industrial solvent vapors
Author:
Silverman, L., Schulte, H.F., First, M.W.
Year:
1946
Bibliographic source:
J. Ind. Hyg. Toxicol., 28, 262-266

Materials and methods

Type of study / information:
Type of experience: other: Sensory irritant properties on humans
Endpoint addressed:
not applicable
Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline available
Principles of method if other than guideline:
The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the unplesant effects of solvent vapours on huma subjects
GLP compliance:
no

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Details on test material:
no information available

Method

Ethical approval:
no
Details on study design:
In a 1200 cubic foot gas cabinet an average number of 12 persons, of mixed sexes, was exposed to a given concentration of solvent vapor for a period of 15 minutes. After the exposure, each individual classified the effect of the vapor on the eyes, nose, and throat. The classifications possible were: no reaction, slight irritating, and very irritating. The odor was listed as absent, definite, moderate, strong, or overpowering. Finally each person was asked if he believed he could work in the atmosphere for an eight-hour day. The subjects, except the experimenters, were kept in ignorance of the actual concentrations and whether or not the exposures to any one solvent were in order of increasing or decreasing concentrations. The amount of vapor which the majority of subjects rejected as a working atmosphere was termed objectionable
Exposure assessment:
not specified
Details on exposure:
In a 1200 cubic foot gas cabinet an average number of 12 persons, of mixed sexes, was exposed to a given concentration of solvent vapor for a period of 15 minutes. After the exposure, each individual classified the effect of the vapor on the eyes, nose, and throat. The classifications possible were: no reaction, slight irritating, and very irritating. The odor was listed as absent, definite, moderate, strong, or overpowering. Finally each person was asked if he believed he could work in the atmosphere for an eight-hour day. The subjects, except the experimenters, were kept in ignorance of the actual concentrations and whether or not the exposures to any one solvent were in order of increasing or decreasing concentrations. The amount of vapor which the majority of subjects rejected as a working atmosphere was termed objectionable

Results and discussion

Results:
Under the conditions of the study, 200 ppm (app. 1066 mg/m³) were sensory irritating to the eyes and the nose but not to the throat of a majority of subjects. At 300 ppm (app. 1599 mg/m³) the odor was not objectionable to the majority of subjects.

Any other information on results incl. tables

None

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Under the conditions of the study, 200 ppm (app. 1066 mg/m³) were sensory irritating to the eyes and the nose but not to the throat of a majority of subjects. At 300 ppm (app. 1599 mg/m³) the odor was not objectionable to the majority of subjects.
Executive summary:

The objective of the experiment was to evaluate on humans the unpleasant, not necessarily toxic, effects of solvent vapors. In a 1200 cubic foot gas cabinet an average number of 12 persons, of mixed sexes, was exposed to a given concentration of solvent vapor for a period of 15 minutes. After the exposure, each individual classified the effect of the vapor on the eyes, nose, and throat. The classifications possible were: no reaction, slight irritating, and very irritating. The odor was listed as absent, definite, moderate, strong, or overpowering. Finally each person was asked if he believed he could work in the atmosphere for an eight-hour day. The subjects, except the experimenters, were kept in ignorance of the actual concentrations and whether or not the exposures to any one solvent were in order of increasing or decreasing concentrations. The amount of vapor which the majority of subjects rejected as a working atmosphere was termed objectionable

Under the conditions of the study, 200 ppm (app. 1066 mg/m³) were sensory irritating to the eyes and the nose but not to the throat of a majority of subjects. At 300 ppm (app. 1599 mg/m³) the odor was not objectionable to the majority of subjects.