Registration Dossier

Physical & Chemical properties

Explosiveness

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
explosiveness
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Peer-reviewed assessment report

Data source

Referenceopen allclose all

Reference Type:
review article or handbook
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
2003
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Sicherheitstechnische Kennzahlen brennbarer Gase und Daempfe
Author:
Nabert and Schon
Year:
1963
Bibliographic source:
Deutscher Eichverlag, Berlin

Materials and methods

Principles of method if other than guideline:
no data, based on national standards
GLP compliance:
no

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Details on test material:
naphthalene
melting point 79 - 81 °C

Results and discussion

Small-scale preliminary testsopen allclose all
Parameter:
other: More sensitive to shock than m-dinitrobenzene
Remarks:
migrated information
Remarks on result:
other: no data
Parameter:
other: More sensitive to friction than m-dinitrobenzene
Remarks:
migrated information
Remarks on result:
other: no data
Parameter:
other: Explosive under influence of flame
Remarks:
migrated information
Remarks on result:
other: no data
Parameter:
other: Explosive (not specified)
Remarks:
migrated information
Remarks on result:
positive (not further specified)
Remarks:
as vapour from 0.9%(vol) - 5.9 %(vol) [lower limit 48 g/m3 - upper limit 315 g/m3]

Any other information on results incl. tables

According to RAR HSE/UK 2003:

1.3.10 Explosivity

The flammability (explosive limits by volume of fuel at 25 °C and 760 mm Hg) for naphthalene have been quoted at 0.9 (lower) to 5.9 (higher) in Lange's Handbook (1992) and Kirk-Othmer (1991) where the original reference is to data obtained by the US Bureau of Mines (Jones and Scott, 1946) using reagent grade naphthalene (melting point = 79-81 °C).

This range is also quoted in the American Petroleum Institute monograph on naphthalene (1978).

The same range for explosive limits is mentioned by Nabert and Schon (1963).

Although the test figures do have some variance this is likely to be due to a combination of the purity of the naphthalene used in the tests and the exact method used.

Naphthalene can be considered as capable of forming explosive mixtures with air in particulate or vapour form.

Applicant's summary and conclusion