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Physical & Chemical properties

Oxidising properties

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Reference
Endpoint:
oxidising liquids
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
2010-10-04 - 2010-10-20
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
guideline study
Qualifier:
equivalent or similar to guideline
Guideline:
EU Method A.21 (Oxidising Properties (Liquids))
Version / remarks:
Testing was conducted using a method designed to be compatible with Method A21 Oxidising Properties (Liquids) of Commission Regulation (EC) No 440/2008 of 30 May 2008, Part A; Methods for the determination of physico-chemical properties.
Deviations:
no
GLP compliance:
yes
Specific details on test material used for the study:
Sponsor's identification: Amine C8
Description: dark brown liquid
Batch number: T7-271109
Date received: 21 September 2010
Expiry date: 31 December 2011
Storage conditions: room temperature in the dark
Contact with:
powdered cellulose
Duration of test (contact time):
10 min
Key result
Sample tested:
test mixture 1:1
Parameter:
mean pressure rise time
Result:
14.762 s
Remarks on result:
other: Mean pressure rise time, based on 5 runs
Sample tested:
reference mixture 1: 1
Parameter:
mean pressure rise time
Result:
3.667 s
Remarks on result:
other: Mean pressure rise time, based on 5 runs

     

The results of the reference mixture of cellulose and nitric acid (65%) are shown in the following table:

Table 10.1

Run Number

Pressure Rise Time (s)

1

3.462

2

4.151

3

3.678

4

3.414

5

3.628

Mean pressure rise time (s) = 3.667


The results of the test item mixture are shown in the following table:

Table 10.2

Run Number

Pressure Rise Time (s)

1

15.735

2

17.726

3

13.253

4

13.459

5

13.635

Mean pressure rise time (s) = 14.762

 

Please also see attached "results" for Typical reference mixture pressure time curve & Typical test item mixture pressure rise curve


Interpretation of results:
GHS criteria not met
Conclusions:
The test item was determined not to have oxidising properties as the mean pressure rise time for the test item/cellulose mixtures was greater than the mean pressure rise time for the nitric acid/cellulose mixtures.
Executive summary:

Method

The oxidising properties of the test item were determined by comparing the pressure rise time, between 690 and 2070 kPa, for mixtures of test item/cellulose with reference mixtures of nitric acid/cellulose. Testing was conducted using a method designed to be compatible with Method A21 Oxidising Properties (Liquids) of Commission Regulation (EC) No 440/2008 of 30 May 2008, Part A; Methods for the determination of physico-chemical properties.

Procedure

The cellulose was dried to constant weight at approximately 105°C. Cellulose (2.5 g) and nitric acid, 65% (2.5 g) were mixed together and the mixture packed into a pressure vessel. The vessel was closed with a bursting disc and 10 amps was applied to the ignition wire. The time between mixing and applying the power was within 10 minutes. The mixture was heated until the pressure disc ruptured or for at least 60 seconds. The pressure rise time between 690 and 2070 kPa, above atmospheric, was recorded. The procedure was repeated 5 times.

The above procedure was repeated using the test item in place of the nitric acid.

Conclusion

The test item was determined not to have oxidising properties as the mean pressure rise time for the test item/cellulose mixtures was greater than the mean pressure rise time for the nitric acid/cellulose mixtures.

Description of key information

The test substance was concluded not to have oxidising properties following a GLP compliant study compatible with EC test method A.21 (Atwal et al., 2010).

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Oxidising properties:
non oxidising

Additional information

Justification for classification or non-classification

The test substance was concluded not to have oxidising properties following an EC A.21 test (Atwal et al., 2010).