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Ecotoxicological information

Short-term toxicity to aquatic invertebrates

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Description of key information

In the key study, the acute toxicity of HHCB towards Daphnia magna was investigated according to OECD guideline 202. The 48h-EC50 was found to be 0.3 mg/l.
The effects of HHCB on the larval development rate of the marine copepod Acartia tonsa was investigated according to draft ISO/DIS 14669 (1997). In this test the 48h‑LC50 was found to be 0.47 mg/l.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

EC50/LC50 for freshwater invertebrates:
0.3 mg/L
EC50/LC50 for marine water invertebrates:
0.47 mg/L

Additional information

The acute toxicity of HHCB towards Daphnia magna was investigated according to OECD guideline 202. The 48h-EC50 was found to be 0.3 mg/l (95% CL: 0.24 -0.39) based on measured concentrations.

The effects of HHCB on the larval development rate of the marine copepod Acartia tonsa was investigated according to draft ISO/DIS 14669 (1997). The 48h‑LC50 was 0.47 mg/l. The test concentrations were not measured and it is known from a similar set-up that concentrations were decreased to only 10-30% after 2 days. The test results were judged to be useful for classification and labelling (EC50 < 1 mg/l).

In a supporting study, the EC50 was calculated based on the results of the prolonged toxicity study with Daphnia magna (Wütrich 1996). The EC50 (72h) was 0.885 mg/l, with 95% confidence limits 0.726 - 1.027 mg/l. Animals were fed. These results are obtained from a GLP study and the results are expressed based on measured concentrations. EC50 (48h) was estimated by interpolation. EC50 (48h) > 0.9 mg/l. The validity criteria were met: control mortality < 20% and reproduction > 60 per daphnia.

As the lowest EC50 was found in the CADASTER study (Dorjava et al., 2012) and as this study was conducted according to the relevant OECD TG, this study was chosen as key study. The study with Acartia tonsa (Wollenberger et al 2003) is used as the key study for marine invertebrates.