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Toxicological information

Basic toxicokinetics

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
basic toxicokinetics in vivo
Type of information:
other: Composite record
Adequacy of study:
supporting study

Data source

Referenceopen allclose all

Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Effect of dose on the absorption and excretion of [14C]benzene administered orally or by inhalation in rats and mice
Author:
Sabourin PJ, Chen BT, Lucier G, Birnbaum LS, Fisher E and Henderson RF
Year:
1987
Bibliographic source:
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 87, 325-336
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to low levels of benzene
Author:
Pekari K, Vainiotalo S, Heikklia P, Palotie A, Luatomo M and Riihimaki V
Year:
1992
Bibliographic source:
Scan J Work Environ Health 18, 317-22
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Toxicological profile for benzene
Author:
ATSDR
Year:
2007
Bibliographic source:
ATSDR
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
European Union Risk Assessment Report for Benzene.
Author:
EU RAR
Year:
2008
Bibliographic source:
EC Joint Research Centre. http://ecb. jrc. ec. europa. eu/documents/Existing-chemicals/RISK_ASSESSMENT/REPORT/benzenereport063. pdf.

Materials and methods

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent

Test animals

Species:
other: Rodent (rats and mice)

Administration / exposure

Route of administration:
other: oral and inhalation

Results and discussion

Toxicokinetic / pharmacokinetic studies

Details on absorption:
Gastrointestinal absorption of benzene in rats and in mice was >97% when doses between 0.5 and 150 mg benzene/kg bw were administered by gavage. Inhalation studies in rodents suggested that the uptake of benzene by the lungs was related to the concentration in a non-linear manner. For inhalation exposures, the mean percentage of inhaled 14C-benzene absorbed and retained in the tissues and blood during a 6 h exposure decreased from 33% to 15% in rats, and from 50% to 10% in mice, as the exposure concentration was increased from approximately 26 to 2600 mg/m³ (8 to 812 ppm).

Any other information on results incl. tables

Benzene appears to be efficiently absorbed following oral dosing in animals. Gastrointestinal absorption of benzene in rats and in mice was >97% when doses between 0.5 and 150 mg benzene/kg bw were administered by gavage (Sabourin et al 1987). Inhalation studies in rodents suggested that the uptake of benzene by the lungs was related to the concentration in a non-linear manner (Sabourin et al 1987). For inhalation exposures, the mean percentage of inhaled 14C-benzene absorbed and retained in the tissues and blood during a 6 h exposure decreased from 33% to 15% in rats, and from 50% to 10% in mice, as the exposure concentration was increased from approximately 26 to 2600 mg/m³ (8 to 812 ppm). Greater absorption of benzene at lower concentrations by mice than rats is partially explained by physiological differences in respiratory rate and tidal volume. At similar vapour concentration exposures, mice take up 1.5 to 2.0-fold the dose per kilogram body weight compared to rats.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Executive summary:

Benzene appears to be efficiently absorbed following oral dosing in animals. Gastrointestinal absorption of benzene in rats and in mice was >97% when doses between 0.5 and 150 mg benzene/kg bw were administered by gavage (Sabourin et al 1987). Inhalation studies in rodents suggested that the uptake of benzene by the lungs was related to the concentration in a non-linear manner (Sabourin et al 1987). For inhalation exposures, the mean percentage of inhaled 14C-benzene absorbed and retained in the tissues and blood during a 6 h exposure decreased from 33% to 15% in rats, and from 50% to 10% in mice, as the exposure concentration was increased from approximately 26 to 2600 mg/m³ (8 to 812 ppm). Greater absorption of benzene at lower concentrations by mice than rats is partially explained by physiological differences in respiratory rate and tidal volume. At similar vapour concentration exposures, mice take up 1.5 to 2.0 -fold the dose per kilogram body weight compared to rats.