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Environmental fate & pathways

Biodegradation in water: screening tests

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Description of key information

Diphenyl tolyl phosphate MCS is readily biodegradable.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Biodegradation in water:
readily biodegradable

Additional information

A modified MITI test (OECD 301C) revealed a 75% degradation of Diphenyl tolyl phosphate MCS based on oxygen demand (Kanne, 1987),

thus demonstrating clear evidence for ready biodegradation.

This notion is further corroborated by a supporting study (Saeger et al., 1979) adressing the biodegradation of three major constituents of

Diphenyl tolyl phosphate MCS, namely Triphenyl phosphate, Tricresyl phosphate and Diphenyl cresyl phosphate.

Diphenyl cresyl phosphate:

showed complete primary degradation in less than 7 days in a river die-away study. In the semi-continuous activated sludge (SCAS) test, rapid primary degradation was also seen. The biodegradation of the substance was also measured at a concentration of 23.1 mg/L using OECD 301B. The degree of CO2 evolution observed accounted for 84.5% biodegradation after 28 day. The substance can therefore be classified as readily biodegradable.

Triphenyl phosphate:

showed complete primary degradation in less than 5 days in a river die-away study. In the semi-continuous activated sludge (SCAS) test, rapid primary degradation was also seen. The biodegradation of the substance was also measured at a concentration of 18.3 mg/L using OECD 301B. The degree of CO2 evolution observed accounted for 81.8% biodegradation after 28 day. The substance can therefore be classified as readily biodegradable.

Tricresyl phosphate:

showed complete primary degradation in less than 7 days in a river die-away study. In the semi-continuous activated sludge (SCAS) test, rapid primary degradation was also seen. The biodegradation of the substance was also measured at a concentration of 26.4 mg/L using OECD 301B. The degree of CO2 evolution observed accounted for 86.3% biodegradation after 28 day. The substance can therefore be classified as readily biodegradable.

Tricresyl phosphate was also found to be readily biodegradable by Kanne (1987) due to a biodegradation of 80% after 28d.