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Toxicological information

Basic toxicokinetics

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
basic toxicokinetics in vivo
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
weight of evidence
Study period:
No data
Reliability:
4 (not assignable)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: The result is sourced from secondary literature (Bast, 2004). The original reference was not available for review.

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
secondary source
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
2004

Materials and methods

Objective of study:
other: absorption, distribution and excretion
Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline followed
GLP compliance:
not specified

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Details on test material:
- Name of test material (as cited in study report): ethyl mercaptan
Radiolabelling:
not specified

Test animals

Species:
guinea pig
Strain:
not specified
Sex:
not specified

Administration / exposure

Route of administration:
oral: unspecified
Vehicle:
not specified
Duration and frequency of treatment / exposure:
No data reported
Doses / concentrations
Remarks:
Doses / Concentrations:
No data reported
No. of animals per sex per dose:
No data reported
Control animals:
not specified
Positive control:
No data reported
Statistics:
No data reported

Results and discussion

Metabolite characterisation studies

Details on metabolites:
No data reported

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Interpretation of results (migrated information): no data
In an oral excretion study in guinea pigs, ethanethiol was quickly absorbed and distributed throughout the body tissues; the majority of the excretion occurred through the kidney as inorganic sulfate (Bast, 2004c).
Executive summary:

In an excretion study conducted in guinea pigs doses of ethanethiol were orally administered. The duration of the experiment was not reported. Excretion of the substance was measured in the urine, feces and breath of the animals.

The test material application produced minimal excretion in the feces of the guinea pigs, but seemed to represent 10% to 20% of the sulfur excreted in the urine and 14% in the breath. The authors of the animal study concluded that ethanethiol was quickly absorbed and distributed throughout the body tissues; the majority of the excretion occurred through the kidney as inorganic sulfate.

The result is sourced from secondary literature (Bast, 2004). The original reference was not available for review. The study received a Klimisch score of 4 and was classified as not assignable as the quality of the study and therefore the results cannot be verified.