Registration Dossier

Environmental fate & pathways

Endpoint summary

Administrative data

Description of key information

Additional information

Phototransformation in air is characterized using quantitative structure property relationships for representative hydrocarbon structures that comprise the hydrocarbon blocks used to assess the environmental risk of this substance with the PETRORISK model (see Product Library in PETRORISK spreadsheet attached to IUCLID Section 13).

 

Hydrocarbons, C6-C7, n-alkanes, isoalkanes, cyclics, <5% n-hexane, as other constituent chemicals of the C7-C9 aliphatic hydrocarbon solvents category, are composed of carbon and hydrogen and are not amenable to hydrolysis because of their molecular structure and the chemical reaction required for this type of transformation to occur. As such, it has a very low potential to hydrolyze. Therefore, this degradative process will not contribute to its removal from the environment.

 

A study using a standardized OECD 301F ready test guideline is available (Shell 1997). Results from this manometric respirometry test procedure demonstrated 98% biodegradation after 28 days. The data demonstrate that hydrocarbons, C6-C7, n-alkanes, isoalkanes, cyclics, <5% n-hexane, biodegrade readily and to a high extent. Therefore no further testing is conducted on biodegradation in water and sediment as well as on biodegradation in soil.

 

As regards bioaccumulation, the substance is a hydrocarbon UVCB and standard tests on bioaccumulation are intended for single substances and are not appropriate for this complex substance. However, as regards aquatic bioaccumulation this endpoint has been calculated for representative hydrocarbon structures using the BCFWIN v2.16 model within EPISuite 3.12 as input to the hydrocarbon block method incorporated into the PETRORISK model. With regard to terrestrial bioaccumulation, this endpoint has been calculated for representative hydrocarbon structures using default algorithms in the EUSES model as input to the hydrocarbon block method incorporated into the PETRORISK model. In both cases the predicted BCFs for hydrocarbons are generally overly conservative since biotransformation is not quantitatively taken into account. Therefore, indirect exposure and resulting risk estimates predicted by PETRORISK are likely to be overestimated.

Adsorption/desorption and distribution modelling are characterized using quantitative structure property relationships for representative hydrocarbon structures that comprise the hydrocarbon blocks used to assess the environmental risk of this substance with the PETRORISK model (see Product Library in PETRORISK spreadsheet attached to IUCLID Section 13).