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Vapour pressure

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Reference
Endpoint:
vapour pressure
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
From 01 June, 2012 to 04 June, 2012
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
guideline study
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 104 (Vapour Pressure Curve)
Deviations:
no
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
EU Method A.4 (Vapour Pressure)
Deviations:
no
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
EPA OPPTS 830.7950 (Vapor Pressure)
Deviations:
no
GLP compliance:
yes (incl. certificate)
Type of method:
effusion method: by loss of weight or by trapping vaporisate
Specific details on test material used for the study:
- Name of test material (as cited in study report): Quaternary ammonium compounds, (C16-18 and C18- unsatd. alkyl) trimethyl, chlorides
- Physical state: Amber paste
- Lot/batch No.: 111207JB
- Storage condition of test material: At room temperature in the dark
Key result
Temp.:
20 °C
Vapour pressure:
< 0 Pa
Remarks on result:
other: (i.e., equivalent to <6.3 x 10E-9 mm Hg)
Key result
Temp.:
25 °C
Vapour pressure:
< 0 Pa
Remarks on result:
other: (i.e., equivalent to <2.2 x 10E-8 mm Hg)
Conclusions:
The vapour pressure was found to be <0.00000084 Pa (i.e., equivalent to <6.3 x 10-9 mm Hg) at 20°C and <0.0000029 Pa (i.e., equivalent to <2.2 x 10-8 mm Hg) at 25°C.
Executive summary:

The vapour pressure was determined according to OECD Guideline 104, EU Method A.4 and US EPA OPPTS 830.7950 (isothermal thermogravimetric effusion method). An amount of 7.58 or 8.13 mg of the test substance was applied to the surface of a roughened glass plate as a homogeneous layer. The weight loss of the test substance was measured continuously as a function of time. Using the weight losses obtained at 170°C, 180°C, 190°C and 200°C, the plot of the log PT of the test substance as function of the reciprocal temperatures was not linear (r < 0.99). This was most probably due to reaction and/or decomposition which was also indicated by the slightly bended weight loss curve at 200°C. The weight loss at 160°C was too low to be accurate and was therefore not used for determination of the vapour pressure. The weight loss of the test substance at 170°C, 180°C, 190°C and 200°C however, was lower than the weight loss of reference substance chrysene at the same temperatures. Accordingly, the vapour pressure of the test substance was determined to be lower than that of chrysene. Therefore, under the conditions of the study, the vapour pressure of the test substance was determined to be <0.00000084 Pa (i.e., equivalent to <6.3 x 10E-9 mm Hg) at 20°C and <0.0000029 Pa (i.e., equivalent to <2.2 x 10E-8 mm Hg) at 25°C.

Description of key information

 The vapour pressure was determined according to OECD Guideline 104, EU Method A.4 and US EPA OPPTS 830.7950 (isothermal thermogravimetric effusion method) (Brekelmans, 2012).

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Vapour pressure:
0 Pa
at the temperature of:
25 °C

Additional information

and <8.4E-7 Pa at 20°C