Registration Dossier

Ecotoxicological information

Long-term toxicity to aquatic invertebrates

Administrative data

Endpoint:
long-term toxicity to aquatic invertebrates
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Study period:
8 weeks
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
study well documented, meets generally accepted scientific principles, acceptable for assessment

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Dietary Inositol Requirement for Juvenile Grass Shrimp, Penaeus monodon
Author:
Shiau S-Y and Su S-L
Year:
2004
Bibliographic source:
Aquaculture, 241:1-8

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline available
GLP compliance:
not specified

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Test material form:
solid
Details on test material:
- Purity: not reported

Sampling and analysis

Analytical monitoring:
yes

Test organisms

Test organisms (species):
other: Grass shrimp, Penaeus monodon

Study design

Test type:
other: Feeding study
Limit test:
no
Total exposure duration:
8 wk
Post exposure observation period:
None

Test conditions

Hardness:
not reported
Test temperature:
26 to 29°C
pH:
6.6 to 6.8
Dissolved oxygen:
Averaged at 7.3 mg O2/L
Salinity:
19 to 21 g/kg
Conductivity:
not reported
Nominal and measured concentrations:
Nominal: 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000. 6000, and 8000 mg/kg of diet
Analytical: 295, 696, 1079, 2036, 3943, 6159, and 8218 mg/kg of diet
Reference substance (positive control):
no

Results and discussion

Effect concentrations
Key result
Duration:
8 wk
Dose descriptor:
LC50
Effect conc.:
>= 8 000 other: mg/kg diet
Nominal / measured:
nominal
Conc. based on:
test mat.
Basis for effect:
mortality
Remarks on result:
other: The survival data indicated that there was a gradual attrition during the 8-week duration of the experiment.
Details on results:
Weight gain, protein efficiency ratio and survival were highest for shrimp fed diets supplemented with ≥ 3943 mg/kg, followed by 2036 mg/kg and lowest for shrimp fed diets supplemented with ≤ 696 mg/kg. The values for these three dietary treatments were significantly different from one another (P<0.05). The survival data indicated that there was a gradual attrition during the 8-week duration of the experiment.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Validity criteria fulfilled:
yes
Conclusions:
Shrimp fed diets supplemented with ≥3943 mg/kg (≥4000 mg/kg nominal) of diet had significantly (P<0.05) survival.
Executive summary:

The dietary test substance requirement of juvenile grass shrimp, Penaeus monodon, was estimated. Purified basal diets were formulated using vitamin-free casein as the protein source. Dietary treatments consisted of graded levels (0, 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, 6000 and 8000 mg/kg of diet) of the test substance added to a basal diet. Each diet was fed to three replicate groups of shrimp initially averaging 0.44±0.01 g for 8 weeks. Shrimp fed diets supplemented with ≥3943 mg/kg of diet had significantly (P<0.05) greater weight gain, protein efficiency ratio (PER), survival and levels of the test substance in the midgut gland than those fed diets supplemented with ≤2036 mg/kg of diet. Lipid in the midgut gland of shrimp fed diets supplemented with ≥1079 mg/kg of diet was higher than that of shrimp fed diets supplemented with ≤696 mg/kg of diet. The midgut gland index (MGI) of shrimp fed diets supplemented with ≥3943 mg/kg of diet was lower than that of shrimp fed diets containing ≤1079 mg/kg of diet. Weight gain percentage, the level of test substance in the midgut gland and the midgut gland index values for the different treatments were analyzed by broken-line regression and indicated that the requirement for dietary test substance in growing P. monodonis was approximately 3400 mg/kg of diet.