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Vapour pressure

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Reference
Endpoint:
vapour pressure
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
Study initiation date : June 01, 2012
Start of experiments : June 11, 2012
End of experiments : June 18, 2012
Study completion date: August 15, 2012
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Study performed in accordance with GLP under OECD Guideline for testing, 104, Gas saturation method
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
EU Method A.4 (Vapour Pressure)
Version / remarks:
EC Council Regulation 440/2008 (30.05.2008)
Deviations:
no
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 104 (Vapour Pressure Curve)
Version / remarks:
March 23, 2006; Vapour pressure: Gas saturation method.
Deviations:
no
Principles of method if other than guideline:
The method used was that described in the OECD Guidelines for Testing of Chemicals, 104, Gas saturation method. The amount of test substance present in a gas phase saturated with test substance is determined by specific analyses. The vapour pressure can easily be calculated from this saturated headspace vapour concentration assuming that the ideal gas law is obeyed.
The guideline method is applicable in a vapour pressure range from 10^-10 Pa to 10^3 Pa. When following the OECD protocol, vapour pressure above 10 Pa. When following the OECD protocol vapour pressure above 10^3 Pa are generally overestimated as aerosol formation can occur when passing a stream of carrier gas over/through the test material. For this reason, as well as for the difficulties related to measuring gas flow rates, the protocol was adapted: Sampling from the saturated headspace was performed using quasi-static sampling instead of dynamic sampling.
GLP compliance:
yes (incl. QA statement)
Type of method:
gas saturation method
Key result
Temp.:
20 °C
Vapour pressure:
0.3 Pa

Headspace vapour concentrations of Cyclamen Aldehyde Extra as found after an equilibration time of 2h, 4h and 6h are presented in the table below:

























Equilibration time (h)Headspace concentration (g.m-3)
20.024
40.022
60.019
Average0.021

 


Additional peaks were observed on the chromatograms of the test samples at a retention time of ~14.5 minutes, and after an equilibration time of 6h, at retention times of ~14.5 and 14.8 minutes, likely due to oxidation of the product under the test conditions. As the test substance is present in large excess on the bottom of the headspace vessel, this small loss due to oxidation was regarded as not critical and the validity of the study was deemed not to be affected.

Conclusions:
The vapour pressure at 20°C was calculated from the average headspace concentration using the ideal gas equation as described previously. The vapour pressure of Cyclamen Aldehyde Extra was found to be 0.3 Pa at 20°C
Executive summary:

The method used was that described in the OECD Guidelines for Testing of Chemicals, 104, Gas saturation method. The amount of test substance present in a gas phase saturated with test substance is determined by specific analyses. The vapour pressure can easily be calculated from this saturated headspace vapour concentration assuming that the ideal gas law is obeyed.


A sufficient quantity of the test substance, around 1 g, was deposited in the closed head space vessel, which was fixed on a support in a temperature controlled water bath, brought to temperature and allowed to equilibrate. A sampling volume of 80ml avoided depletion of the test substance from the vapour phase. Samples were analysed via GC-FID.


The mass of the test substance in the volume sampled from the headspace container was calculated from the average analytical concentrations and the solvent volume used to desorb the sorbent cartridge using the ideal gas equation.


The vapour pressure at 20°C was calculated from the average headspace concentration using the ideal gas equation as described previously.


The vapour pressure of Cyclamen Aldehyde Extra was found to be  0.3 Pa at 20°C

Description of key information

The vapour pressure at 20°C was calculated from the average headspace concentration using the ideal gas equation as described previously. The vapour pressure of Cylcamen Aldehyde Extra was found to be 0.3 Pa at 20°C 

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Vapour pressure:
0.3 Pa
at the temperature of:
20 °C

Additional information

 

The method used was that described in the OECD Guidelines for Testing of Chemicals, 104, Gas saturation method. The amount of test substance present in a gas phase saturated with test substance is determined by specific analyses. The vapour pressure can easily be calculated from this saturated headspace vapour concentration assuming that the ideal gas law is obeyed.

A sufficient quantity of the test substance, around 1 g, was deposited in the closed head space vessel, which was fixed on a support in a temperature controlled water bath, brought to temperature and allowed to equilibrate. A sampling volume of 80ml avoided depletion of the test substance from the vapour phase. Samples were analysed via GC-FID.

 

The mass of the test substance in the volume sampled from the headspace container was calculated from the average analytical concentrations and the solvent volume used to desorb the sorbent cartridge using the ideal gas equation.

 

The vapour pressure at 20°C was calculated from the average headspace concentration using the ideal gas equation as described previously.

 

The vapour pressure of Cylcamen Aldehyde Extra was found to be  0.3 Pa at 20°C

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