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Long-term toxicity to aquatic invertebrates

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Description of key information

No chronic aquatic toxicity data are available for farnesene. Based on a read-across study with a structural analogue - farnesane, the NOEC for chronic toxicity of farnesene to daphnia is predicted to be greater than the limit of water solubility (11 μg/L). See read across justification section 13

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Additional information

No chronic aquatic toxicity data are available for farnesene. Based on a read-across study with a structural analogue - farnesane, the NOEC for chronic toxicity to daphnia is predicted to be greater than the limit of water of water solubility.

In a read across chronic daphnia study, there were no effects on survival or dry weight at the highest dose tested (77 μg a.i./L).

Daphnids exposed at a concentration of 77 μg a.i./L had statistically significant reductions in length and reproduction in comparison to the pooled control. The NOEC, based on growth and reproduction, was therefore 54 μg a.i./L. The LOEC was 77 μg a.i./L and the MATC w

as calculated to be 64 μg a.i./L. The 21-day EC50 values for adult immobility and reproduction were both >77 μg a.i./L, the highest concentration tested.

In this study solvent was used to enhance the water solubility of farnesane which is known to be highly insoluble; this approach is often used in ecotoxicity studies with substances that are not readily soluble in water. The results provide an indication of the possible toxicity of the substance if it were capable of dissolution. However, these are not naturally occurring conditions and hence water solubility and exposure of organisms are overestimated. The measured water solubility of farnesane is 0.25 μg/L and, based on results of this study, no toxicity would be expected at this concentration under normal environmental conditions.

Based on read across to the analogue farnesane, it is predicted that farnesene would not cause toxicity to daphnia following chronic exposure at the limit of water solubility (11 μg/L). Justification for the use of read-across data can be found in section 13 of the dossier.