Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Endpoint:
epidemiological data
Type of information:
migrated information: read-across from supporting substance (structural analogue or surrogate)
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Publication, reasonably documented, acceptable for assessment

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Mortality among workers employed in the titanium dioxide production industry in Europe.
Author:
Boffetta P et al.
Year:
2004
Bibliographic source:
Cancer Causes and Control, 15: 697-706.

Materials and methods

Study type:
other: epidemiological
Endpoint addressed:
carcinogenicity
Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline available
Principles of method if other than guideline:
Epidemiology study: association of cancer incidence and iron exposure in titanium dioxide workers
GLP compliance:
no

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Test material form:
not specified
Details on test material:
No details

Method

Type of population:
occupational
other: Titanium dioxide workers
Ethical approval:
not specified
Details on study design:
Inhalation exposure assessment
Type of experience: Human - epidemiology.
Workers involved in the manufacture of titanium dioxide frequently also come into contact with copperas (iron II sulphate). This extensive study, 
although not designed to identify effects other than those due to titanium dioxide, investigated 15,017 workers (cohort represented 371,067 
person-years), and showed standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of 0.87 (95 confidence interval [CI] 0.83-0.90) among men and 0.58 (95 CI 0.40-0.82)  among women. Among men, the SMR of lung cancer was significantly increased (1.23, 95 CI 1.10-1.38); however, mortality from lung cancer did not increase with duration of employment or estimated cumulative exposure to TiO2 dust. Data on smoking were available for over one third of cohort  members. In three countries, the prevalence of smokers was higher among cohort members compared to the national populations. The results of the study did not suggest a carcinogenic effect of TiO2 dust on the human lung and from this, it may be inferred that concomitant  
exposure to copperas was without effect on the SMRs
Exposure assessment:
not specified
Details on exposure:
Type of experience: Human - epidemiology.
Workers involved in the manufacture of titanium dioxide frequently also come into contact with copperas (iron II sulphate). This extensive study, 
although not designed to identify effects other than those due to titanium dioxide, investigated 15,017 workers (cohort represented 371,067 
person-years), and showed standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of 0.87 (95 confidence interval [CI] 0.83-0.90) among men and 0.58 (95 CI 0.40-0.82)  among women. Among men, the SMR of lung cancer was significantly increased (1.23, 95 CI 1.10-1.38); however, mortality from lung cancer did not 
increase with duration of employment or estimated cumulative exposure to TiO2 dust. Data on smoking were available for over one third of cohort 
members. In three countries, the prevalence of smokers was higher among cohort members compared to the national populations. The results of the study did not suggest a carcinogenic effect of TiO2 dust on the human lung and from this, it may be inferred that concomitant  
exposure to copperas was without effect on the SMRs

Results and discussion

Results:
Workers involved in the manufacture of titanium dioxide frequently also come into contact with copperas (iron II sulphate). This extensive study, 
although not designed to identify effects other than those due to titanium dioxide, investigated 15,017 workers (cohort represented 371,067 
person-years), and showed standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of 0.87 (95 confidence interval [CI] 0.83-0.90) among men and 0.58 (95 CI 0.40-0.82)  among women. Among men, the SMR of lung cancer was significantly increased (1.23, 95 CI 1.10-1.38); however, mortality from lung cancer did not 
increase with duration of employment or estimated cumulative exposure to TiO2 dust. Data on smoking were available for over one third of cohort 
members. In three countries, the prevalence of smokers was higher among cohort members compared to the national populations. The results of the study did not suggest a carcinogenic effect of TiO2 dust on the human lung and from this, it may be inferred that concomitant  
exposure to copperas was without effect on the SMR

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Workers involved in the manufacture of titanium dioxide frequently also come into contact with copperas (iron II sulphate). This extensive study, 
although not designed to identify effects other than those due to titanium dioxide, investigated 15,017 workers (cohort represented 371,067 
person-years), and showed standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of 0.87 (95 confidence interval [CI] 0.83-0.90) among men and 0.58 (95 CI 0.40-0.82)  among women. Among men, the SMR of lung cancer was significantly increased (1.23, 95 CI 1.10-1.38); however, mortality from lung cancer did not 
increase with duration of employment or estimated cumulative exposure to TiO2 dust. Data on smoking were available for over one third of cohort 
members. In three countries, the prevalence of smokers was higher among cohort members compared to the national populations. The results of the study did not suggest a carcinogenic effect of TiO2 dust on the human lung and from this, it may be inferred that concomitant  
exposure to copperas was without effect on the SMR
Executive summary:

Workers involved in the manufacture of titanium dioxide frequently also come into contact with copperas (iron II sulphate). This extensive study, 

although not designed to identify effects other than those due to titanium dioxide, investigated 15,017 workers (cohort represented 371,067 

person-years), and showed standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of 0.87 (95 confidence interval [CI] 0.83-0.90) among men and 0.58 (95 CI 0.40-0.82)  among women. Among men, the SMR of lung cancer was significantly increased (1.23, 95 CI 1.10-1.38); however, mortality from lung cancer did not 

increase with duration of employment or estimated cumulative exposure to TiO2 dust. Data on smoking were available for over one third of cohort 

members. In three countries, the prevalence of smokers was higher among cohort members compared to the national populations.
The results of the study did not suggest a carcinogenic effect of TiO2 dust on the human lung and from this, it may be inferred that concomitant  

exposure to copperas was without effect on the SMR