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Toxicological information

Carcinogenicity

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Description of key information

 Supporting data on the analogue substance hydrogen chloride (HCl) has been submitted supporting the conclusion that this group of acids are not carcinogenic. (Read-across justification in Section 8.6 Repeat dose toxicity)
In addition, hydrogen bromide (HBr) is an inorganic gas under standard temperature and pressures and forms a strong mineral acid (hydrobromic acid) in water. HBr is generally unmeasurable in the body as it changes directly to hydrobromic acid in water forming hydrogen and bromide ions.
In air, it may form bromine but the reaction pathway ultimately ends with the formation of bromide ions (Annex VIII Section 8.8.1 Toxicokinetics assessment). It is generally accepted that bromide is the chemical moiety of concern for long-term assessment of systemic HBr toxicity.
Sellakumar, A.R., et al. (1985) reported that no pre-neoplastic or neoplastic nasal lesions were observed in a 128-week inhalation study with SD male rats at 10 ppm (9.7 mg/m3) HCl gas.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Justification for classification or non-classification

Supporting data on the analogue substance HCl has been submitted supporting the conclusion that this group of acids are not carcinogenic.

Additional information

Supporting data on the analogue substance hydrogen chloride (HCl) has been submitted supporting the conclusion that this group of acids are not carcinogenic.(Read-across justification in Section 8.6 Repeat dose toxicity). In addition, hydrogen bromide (HBr) is an inorganic gas under standard temperature and pressures and forms a strong mineral acid (hydrobromic acid) in water. HBr is generally unmeasurable in the body as it changes directly to hydrobromic acid in water forming hydrogen and bromide ions. In air, it may form bromine but the reaction pathway ultimately ends with the formation of bromide ions (Annex VIII Section 8.8.1 Toxicokinetics assessment). It is generally accepted that bromide is the chemical moiety of concern for long-term assessment of systemic hydrogen bromide toxicity Sellakumar, A.R., et al. (1985) reported thatno pre-neoplastic or neoplastic nasal lesions were observed in a 128-week inhalation study with SD male rats at 10 ppm (9.7 mg/m3) HCl gas.