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Physical & Chemical properties

Melting point / freezing point

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Reference
Endpoint:
melting point/freezing point
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
August 17, 2011 - January 10, 2012
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
guideline study
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 102 (Melting point / Melting Range)
Deviations:
no
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
EU Method A.1 (Melting / Freezing Temperature)
Deviations:
no
GLP compliance:
yes (incl. certificate)
Type of method:
thermal analysis
Remarks:
(differential scanning calorimetry (DSC))
Key result
Melting / freezing pt.:
40 °C

Preliminary test

From 300°C upwards the weight of the sample decreased significantly. At 365°C the sample weight had decreased by 25%. After the experiment, a black molten residue remained in the sample container (original colour: light yellow). The change of the colour indicated reaction and/or decomposition of the test substance.

Main study (experiment #1)

An endothermic peak between 25°C and 75°C was observed. The extrapolated onset temperature of the peak could not be determined, because the effect appeared directly from the start of the experiment. The effect was most likely obtained due to melting of the test substance. At temperatures >75°C, effects were observed which were due to evaporation of water and/or other volatile components and reaction/decomposition. After the experiment, a brown coagulated residue remained in the sample container. The change of the colour indicated reaction and/or decomposition of the test substance.

Main study (experiment #2)

An endothermic peak between 25°C and 75°C was observed. The extrapolated onset temperature of the peak was 39.99°C. The effect was most likely obtained due to melting of the test substance. From 75°C effects were observed which were due to evaporation of water and/or other volatile components and reaction/decomposition. After the experiment, a brown coagulated residue remained in the sample container. The change of the colour indicated reaction and/or decomposition of the test substance.

Main study (experiment #3)

To investigate the melting peak between 25°C and 75°C the third experiment was stopped directly after the effect. The extrapolated onset temperature of the melting peak was 39.18°C. After the experiment, a coagulated residue remained in the sample container.

Main study (experiment #4)

To investigate the endothermic peak, a lower heating rate of 5°C/minute was applied in the fourth experiment. The extrapolated onset temperature of the melting peak was 35.97°C. This difference in onset temperature with respect to those obtained at a heating rate of 20°C/minute is caused by a difference in slope of the endothermic peak. The start temperature of the endothermic effect, however, is equal at both heating rates. After the experiment, a coagulated residue remained in the sample container. No colour change was observed. Therefore, this peak was considered as the melting peak.

The average melting temperature was based on the experiments with a heating rate of 20°C/minute.

Conclusions:
The melting temperature of the substance was determined using DSC in accordance with OECD 102, EU Method A.1 and GLP. The melting temperature of the test substance was 40°C (313K).

Description of key information

The melting temperature of the substance is 40°C (313K).

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Melting / freezing point at 101 325 Pa:
40 °C

Additional information

The melting temperature of the substance was determined using DSC, in accordance with OECD 102, EU Method A.1 and GLP.