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Environmental fate & pathways

Distribution modelling

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
distribution modelling
Type of information:
calculation (if not (Q)SAR)
Remarks:
Migrated phrase: estimated by calculation
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
4 (not assignable)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Only abstract and secondary source available

Data source

Referenceopen allclose all

Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Behavior Assessment Model for Trace Organics in Soil: III. Application of Screening Model
Author:
Jury WA, Spencer WF, Farmer WJ
Year:
1984
Bibliographic source:
J Environ Qual 13:573-9 http://jeq.scijournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/13/4/573
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Behavior Assessment Model for Trace Organics in Soil: I. Model Description
Author:
Jury WA, Spencer WF, Farmer WJ
Year:
1983
Bibliographic source:
J Environ Qual 12:558-564 http://jeq.scijournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/12/4/558
Reference Type:
secondary source
Title:
Environmental Health Criteria 208 CARBON TETRACHLORIDE
Author:
de Fouw J
Year:
1999
Bibliographic source:
ISBN 92 4 157208 6, ISSN 0250-863X, self-published WHO, Geneva, Switzerland, 199p http://www.inchem.org/documents/ehc/ehc/ehc208.htm

Materials and methods

Model:
other: according to Jury et al (1983)
Media:
other: soil-air

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent

Results and discussion

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Executive summary:

The soil chemical screening model developed in Jury et al. (1983) is applied to a set of 35 chemicals for which benchmark properties(organic C partition coefficient, vapor pressure, solubility,half-life) have been obtained. Environmental screening tests are conducted on the chemicals to determine their relative convective mobility, diffusive mobility, volatility, and persistence with the results presented in a series of classifications ratingthe susceptibility of the chemical to a given loss pathway.

The convective mobility tests estimate the time required fora pulse of chemical to travel a distance of 10 cm through anideal soil of uniform water content and organic C content whilebeing subjected to a water application rate of 1 cm/day. Thediffusive mobility tests determine the time required for a chemicalto diffuse 10 cm through the same ideal soil. In the volatilization screening tests, each chemical is applied at a uniform concentrationof 1 kg/ha to a standard depth in the soil with uniform propertiesand is allowed to volatilize through a stagnant air boundarylayer during a specified time period in the presence or absenceof water evaporation. The resulting volatilization fluxes andcumulative losses for a standard time period are used to categorizethe relative susceptibility of the chemical to loss to the atmosphere.The persistence tests are used to determine the amount of chemical left after a specified time period when it is free not onlyto degrade but also to volatilize.

Jury et al. (1984) predicted that CTC would have a volatilization half-life of 0.2 days at a depth of 1 cm and 0.8 days at a depth of 10 cm in soil, based on volatilization tests and assuming a uniform distribution of the chemical with depth.