Registration Dossier

Diss Factsheets

Administrative data

Hazard for aquatic organisms

Freshwater

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC aqua (freshwater)
PNEC value:
0.04 µg/L
Assessment factor:
3
Extrapolation method:
sensitivity distribution

Marine water

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC aqua (marine water)
PNEC value:
0.86 µg/L
Assessment factor:
10
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor

STP

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC STP
PNEC value:
0.025 mg/L
Assessment factor:
1
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor

Sediment (freshwater)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC sediment (freshwater)
PNEC value:
438.13 mg/kg sediment dw
Assessment factor:
1
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor

Sediment (marine water)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC sediment (marine water)
PNEC value:
438.13 mg/kg sediment dw
Assessment factor:
1
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor

Hazard for air

Hazard for terrestrial organisms

Soil

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC soil
PNEC value:
0.794 mg/kg soil dw
Extrapolation method:
equilibrium partitioning method

Hazard for predators

Secondary poisoning

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no potential for bioaccumulation

Additional information

Conclusion on classification

The classification and labeling guidance states that if the solubility of a metal compound is greater than the L(E)C50 then it should be classified for acute and chronic hazard based on the available ecotoxicity data and the standard classification criteria. This substance has a measured solubility greater than the acute ecotoxicity reference value of EC50 of 0.22 µg Ag/L and is therefore considered a soluble form.

This acute ecotoxicity reference value results in a classification of Acute and Chronic Category 1 under the CLP Regulations. Under the CLP Regulations an M factor must also be assigned to substances classified as Acute Category 1, Chronic Category 1. Based on the Regulations the acute M factor for this substance is 1000.

On 10thMarch 2011 Commission Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 [CLP Regulations] was amended for the second time. The acute environmental classification is still based on acute data. However, the chronic environmental classification is now based on a chronic data set, if this is available. A complete chronic data set is available for silver.

A number of chronic ecotoxicity studies are available for fish, invertebrates and algae for soluble silver substances. The lowest reliable chronic value is an EC10 of 0.16 µg Ag/L for silver chloride toxicity to the algae Nostoc muscorum (Rai et al. 1990). This result confirms the chronic classification of this substance under the CLP Regulations. Under the CLP Regulations a chronic M factor must also be assigned to substances classified as Chronic Category 1. Based on the Regulations the chronic M factor for this substance is 100.