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Sediment toxicity

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Description of key information

In the absence of experimental data the Equilibrium Partitioning Method has been used to derive a sediment PNEC on the basis of the aquatic data when appropriate. 

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information

Sediment toxicity data was only available for a few category members. All the studies identified reported on the acute toxicity to sediment organisms, and so do not fulfil the REACH information requirement for chronic toxicity data nor provide sufficient data to derive sediment PNEC.

Three studies on the toxicity of tetradec-1 -ene were identified (Roddie, 1997; Dorn and Wong, 2002; Harris, 2003). These studies report 10 day LC50 for the sediment organisms Corophium volutator and Leptocheirus plumulosis in the range 86.95 -2004 mg/kg. Two studies on the toxicity of hexadec-1 -ene were identified (Dorn and Wong, 2002; Roddie, 1997). These studies report 10 day LC50 for the sediment organisms Corophium volutator and Leptocheirus plumulosis in the range 706 - 4780 mg/kg. Two studies on the toxicity of alkenes C15 - 18 were identified (Daniel et al, 2006; Whale, 1995). These studies report 10 day LC50 for the sediment organisms Corophium volutator and Leptocheirus plumulosis in the range 357 - >1000 mg/kg. Four studies on the toxicity of alkenes C16 - 18 were identified (Jewell et al., 2005; Daniel et al., 2006;Roddie, 1999; Jewell et al., 2004). These studies report 10 day LC50s for the sediment organisms Corophium volutator and Leptocheirus plumulosis in the range 182 - 3773 mg/kg dry weight. The studies used a variety of natural and artificial sediments, but none included analytical monitoring to confirm the exposure concentrations. Due to this, these studies should be considered as indicative of the concentrations of these test items that may cause acute sediment toxicity.

In the absence of experimental data the Equilibrium Partitioning Method has been used to derive a sediment PNEC on the basis of the aquatic data when appropriate. Using this PNEC the chemical safety assessment according to Annex I has not indicated a need to investigate further the effects of the substance and/or degradation products on sediment organisms and therefore new sediment testing is not required. For category members where a sediment PNEC could not be derived using the Equilibrium Partitioning Method due to a lack of aquatic toxicity the chemical safety assessment according to Annex I has also not indicated a need to investigate further the effects of the substance and/or degradation products on sediment organisms and therefore new testing is not required.