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Diss Factsheets

Physical & Chemical properties

Endpoint summary

Administrative data

Description of key information

Additional information

appearance/physical state/colour

Lithium bromide is a white, odourless, crystalline solid.

Melting point

Based on the handbook and published data, lithium bromide has a melting point of 547 °C.

Boiling point

In accordance with column 2 of REACH Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006, Annex VII, section 7.3, the boiling point does not need to be determined for solids which either melt above 300 °C or decompose before boiling. Lithium bromide has a melting point of 547 °C and therefore a study on the boiling point is not required.

Density

Based on the handbook and published data, lithium bromide has a relative density of 3.464 at 25 °C.

Particle size distribution

The particle size distribution of lithium bromide was measured in two studies using volumetric and counted distribution. The particle size distribution (volume distribution) of the test item produced the following values: d10: 7.99 µm, d50: 20.21 µm, d90: 38.27 µm. The particle size of the test item determined by counted distribution gave the following results: d10: 94.10 - 102.22 µm, d50: 188.87 - 198.90 µm, d90: 302.33 - 315.05 µm.

Differences of the results may depend on the technique of production and / or measurement of particle size distribution incl. sample preparation. Consequently, for lithium bromide the percent of particles <10 µm is in the range of 0 - 20 % according to the available data.

Vapour pressure

In accordance with column 2 of REACH Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006, Annex VII, section 7.5, the vapour pressure does not need to be determined as the melting point is above 300 °C. Lithium bromide has a melting point of 547 °C and therefore a study on vapour pressure is not required.

Partition coefficient

According to column 2 of REACH Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006, Annex VII, section 7.8, the test on partition coefficient n-octanol/water does not need to be conducted as lithium bromide is an inorganic compound. Further, the theoretical, calculated log Pow is -0.37 (EPIWIN calculation), i.e. very low as expected for an inorganic salt.

Water solubility

According to the handbook data the water solubility of lithium bromide is 1430 g/L at 20 °C.

Surface tension

In accordance with column 2 of REACH Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006, Annex VII, section 7.6, the determination of surface tension only needs to be conducted if surface activity is to be expected or can be predicted. Based on the molecular structure, surface tension is not expected for lithium bromide.

Flash point

In accordance with column 2 of REACH Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006, Annex VII, section 7.9, the determination of the flash point does not need to be conducted, because lithium bromide is an inorganic solid and not a liquid.

Autoflammability

In accordance with column 2 of REACH Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006, Annex VII, section 7.12, a self ignition temperature study does not need to be conducted as lithium bromide is not flammable (see IUCLID section 4.13). Further, experience in handling and use gives no indication that the substance is self-heating up to 400 °C.

Flammability

A flammability study was performed with lithium bromide according to UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods, Manual of tests and Criteria, N1: Test Method for readily combustible solids, sub-section 33.2.1.4. Based on this, lithium bromide (solid) is non-flammable. (FMC, 2012)

The chemical structure of lithium bromide does not contain chemical groups, which may lead to the conclusion that the test substance is capable of developing a dangerous amount of (flammable) gas in contact with water. It can also be concluded that lithium bromide is not pyrophoric (Ref.: R.7a: Guidance on information requirements and chemical safety assessment, EU-Document (2012). The experience in handling and use does not indicate flammability upon contact with water or pyrophoric properties.

Lithium bromide does not meet the criteria for self-reactive substances and organic peroxides. Therefore, no experimental determination of flammability regarding these kinds of flammability testing was carried out.

Explosiveness

In accordance with column 2 of REACH Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006, Annex VII, section 7.11, the chemical structure of lithium bromide does not contain chemical groups or individual structural components, which may lead to the conclusion that the substance possesses explosive properties (Re.: 7a: Guidance on information requirements and chemical safety assessment, EU-Document (2012).

Oxidising properties

In accordance with column 2 of REACH Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006, Annex VII, section 7.13, the chemical structure of lithium bromide does not contain chemical groups, which may lead to the conclusion that the test substance has oxidizing properties. Therefore a test on oxidizing properties does not need to be conducted (refer to guidance on information requirements and chemical safety assessment, Chapter R. 7a, 2012).

Stability in organic solvents and identity of relevant degradation products

In accordance with column 2 of REACH Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006, Annex IX, section 7.15, the determination of the stability in organic solvents was waived, because lithium bromide is an inorganic compound.

Storage stability and reactivity towards container material

Corrosion to metals:

In accordance with ECHA guidance on the application of the CLP Criteria section 2.15, the test has obviously been designed for liquids. Thus, as the substance is a solid at room temperature the study was not conducted.

Dissociation constant

The solubility equilibrium of lithium bromide exists when the chemical compound in the solid state is in chemical equilibrium with a solution of that compound. The equilibrium is an example of dynamic equilibrium in that some individual molecules migrate between the solid and solution phases such that the rates of dissolution and precipitation are equal to one another. When equilibrium is established, the solution is saturated. The concentration of the solute in a saturated solution is known as the solubility. Dissolution with dissociation is a characteristic of salts like lithium bromide. Thus, one type of solubility equilibrium is the reversible dissolution with dissociation. Lithium bromide dissociates in its constituent ions when it is dissolving in water:

LiBr(s) <=> Li+(aq) + Br-(aq)

The corresponding solubility product Ksp is expressed as:

Ksp= [Li+]*[Br-]

The relation between the solubility S and the solubility product Ksp of a salt AmBn like lithium bromide is as follows:

S = (Ksp / (m^m * n^n))^(1/(m+n))

m = 1

n = 1

The solubility S of lithium bromide at 25 degrees Celsius is 1810 g/L and the solubility product Ksp was calculated to be 434.33 mol2/L2. Expressed in a logarithmic form the Ksp is log Ksp= 2.64.

Viscosity

Lithium bromide is a solid and therefore the determination of viscosity has been waived (refer to guidance on information requirements and chemical safety assessment, EU-Document, chapter R. 7a, 2012).

Additional physico-chemical information

Flammable Aerosols:

Section 2.4.2 of Guidance on the application on the CLP Criteria states as follows: “Aerosols, this means aerosol dispensers, are any non-refillable receptacles made of metal, glass or plastics and containing a gas compressed, liquefied or dissolved under pressure, with or without a liquid, paste or powder, and fitted with a release device allowing the contents to be ejected as solid or liquid particles in suspension in a gas, as a foam, paste or powder or in a liquid state or in a gaseous state.” Thus, as the substance does not meet the definition for aerosol, the test was waived.

Gases under pressure:

In accordance with section 1.0 Annex I of Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008, the test does not need to be conducted as the boiling point of the substance is above 20 °C, i.e. substance is not completely gaseous at 20 °C at standard pressure. Thus, as the substance is not a gas at room temperature, the test was not conducted.