Registration Dossier

Ecotoxicological information

Ecotoxicological Summary

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Administrative data

Hazard for aquatic organisms

Freshwater

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Marine water

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

STP

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Sediment (freshwater)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Sediment (marine water)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for air

Air

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for terrestrial organisms

Soil

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for predators

Secondary poisoning

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no potential for bioaccumulation

Additional information

In unbuffered media, the effects on aquatic organisms arising from exposure to acetic acid are thought to result from a reduction in the pH of the ambient environment to a level below their tolerable range. Aquatic ecosystems are characterized by among other factors, their pH; the resident biota is adapted to pH within a tolerable range. The pH of aquatic habitats can range from 6 in poorly-buffered ‘soft’ waters to 9 in well-buffered ‘hard’ waters. The tolerance of aquatic ecosystems to natural variations in pH is well understood and has been quantified and reported extensively in ecological publications and handbooks (e.g. OECD SIDS for CAS No. 7647-01-0, hydrogen chloride). It is not considered appropriate or useful to derive a single aquatic PNEC for acetic acid because any effects will not be a consequence of true chemical toxicity and will be a function of, and dependent on, the buffering capacity of the environment. Physical hazards related to pH effects are considered to be negligible in the environment because the substance and its hydrolysis products will enter the environment via a buffered WWTP, or will be buffered by the surrounding environment.

Conclusion on classification

Harmonised classification (ref. 607-002-00-6) and the joint submission self-classification under CLP Regulation does not include any classification and labelling for the environment (conclusive, but not sufficient for classification).