Registration Dossier

Environmental fate & pathways

Monitoring data

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
monitoring data
Type of information:
other: BUA report
Adequacy of study:
other information
Reliability:
other: BUA report
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: BUA report

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
other: BUA report
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
1990

Materials and methods

Principles of method if other than guideline:
BUA report
GLP compliance:
not specified

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent

Results and discussion

Any other information on results incl. tables

BUA report:

Several publications for monitoring data of 1,2 -dichlorobenzene in the compartments landfill leachate, treated wastewater, sludge, geosphere and biota were summarized in the assessment of the BUA report 53 (1990). The reliability of these publications was not assignable because references were only cited as secondary literature.

Landfill leachate

Leachate from the Georgswerder landfill in Hamburg (Germany) contained total dichlorobenzene levels ranging from non-detectable to 420 µg/l (1981/1982). The sum of the dichlorobenzenes was 450 mg/kg in 1983.

In the USA and Canada, measured concentrations of 15 g/kg and 0.78 µg/l were found. The maximum o-dichlorobenzen concentration in leachate from 44 hazardous landfills in the USA was 670 µg/l.

Treated wastewater

A study of wastewater conducted from 1980 to 1983 in The Netherlands returned o-dichlorobenzene levels of < 5 µg/l in the influents and effluents of six municipal wastewater-treatment plants, five of which also handled industrial wastewater. One sample contained 15 µg/l in the influent and 5 µg/l in the effluent, after treatment in a so-called oxidation ditch.

In the USA and Canada, concentrations of o-dichlorobenzene in influents and effluents (domestic and industrial) ranged from not detectable to 860 µg/l.

Sludge

In the sludge from wastewater treatment plants for municipal and industrial wastewater, the concentrations of o-dichlorobenzene ranged from < 10 µg/kg dry weight to 809 mg/kg dry weight.

Geosphere

Soil from an agricultural area in Germany contained no o-dichlorobenzen (limit of detection: 0.4 mg/kg dry weight). However, soil in and around a domestic refuse dump in The Netherland was contaminated with, among othe rsubstances, up to 325 µg o-dichlorobenzene/kg dry weight.

In the USA, soil contained between 3.5 and 50 mg/kg of o-dichlorobenzene.

Biota:

o-dichlorobenzene was detected in fish (fresh and salt water) at concentrations between "in traces" and 1200 µg/kg, in aquatic (fresh and saltwater) invertebrates between "in traces" and 575 µg/kg, in the fat of pigs at more than 1 µg/kg. Cow's milk containted no (limit of detection: 0.1 µg/kg) or 2.6 µg o-dichlorobenzene/kg (fresh weight) or 81.25 µg/kg (fat), respectively, and the beef contained 1.0 µg/kg (fresh weight) or 47.6 µg/kg (fat), respectively. In the meat and chicken eggs a concentration of 1.8 µg/kg o-dichlorobenzene was measured.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Executive summary:

Several publications for monitoring data of 1,2 -dichlorobenzene in the compartments landfill leachate, treated wastewater, sludge, geosphere and biota were summarized in the assessment of the BUA report 53 (1990). The reliability of these publications was not assignable because references were only cited as secondary literature.

Landfill leachate

Leachate from the Georgswerder landfill in Hamburg (Germany) contained total dichlorobenzene levels ranging from non-detectable to 420 µg/l (1981/1982). The sum of the dichlorobenzenes was 450 mg/kg in 1983.

In the USA and Canada, measured concentrations of 15 g/kg and 0.78 µg/l were found. The maximum o-dichlorobenzen concentration in leachate from 44 hazardous landfills in the USA was 670 µg/l.

Treated wastewater

A study of wastewater conducted from 1980 to 1983 in The Netherlands returned o-dichlorobenzene levels of < 5 µg/l in the influents and effluents of six municipal wastewater-treatment plants, five of which also handled industrial wastewater. One sample contained 15 µg/l in the influent and 5 µg/l in the effluent, after treatment in a so-called oxidation ditch.

In the USA and Canada, concentrations of o-dichlorobenzene in influents and effluents (domestic and industrial) ranged from not detectable to 860 µg/l.

Sludge

In the sludge from wastewater treatment plants for municipal and industrial wastewater, the concentrations of o-dichlorobenzene ranged from < 10 µg/kg dry weight to 809 mg/kg dry weight.

Geosphere

Soil from an agricultural area in Germany contained no o-dichlorobenzen (limit of detection: 0.4 mg/kg dry weight). However, soil in and around a domestic refuse dump in The Netherland was contaminated with, among othe rsubstances, up to 325 µg o-dichlorobenzene/kg dry weight.

In the USA, soil contained between 3.5 and 50 mg/kg of o-dichlorobenzene.

Biota:

o-dichlorobenzene was detected in fish (fresh and salt water) at concentrations between "in traces" and 1200 µg/kg, in aquatic (fresh and saltwater) invertebrates between "in traces" and 575 µg/kg, in the fat of pigs at more than 1 µg/kg. Cow's milk containted no (limit of detection: 0.1 µg/kg) or 2.6 µg o-dichlorobenzene/kg (fresh weight) or 81.25 µg/kg (fat), respectively, and the beef contained 1.0 µg/kg (fresh weight) or 47.6 µg/kg (fat), respectively. In the meat and chicken eggs a concentration of 1.8 µg/kg o-dichlorobenzene was measured.