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Environmental fate & pathways

Biodegradation in water: screening tests

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Reference
Endpoint:
biodegradation in water: ready biodegradability
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
test procedure in accordance with national standard methods with acceptable restrictions
Remarks:
National guideline study
Qualifier:
equivalent or similar to
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 301 C (Ready Biodegradability: Modified MITI Test (I))
Deviations:
not specified
GLP compliance:
not specified
Oxygen conditions:
aerobic
Inoculum or test system:
activated sludge (adaptation not specified)
Duration of test (contact time):
28 d
Initial conc.:
100 mg/L
Parameter:
other: Biochemical oxygen demand
Value:
0
Sampling time:
28 d
Interpretation of results:
under test conditions no biodegradation observed
Conclusions:
A test on biodegradation following OECD Guideline 301C with activated sludge exposed to 100 mg o-dichlorobenzene/L under aerobic conditions for 28 days showed that o-dichlorobenzene is not readily biodegradable.
Executive summary:

A test on biodegradation following OECD Guideline 301C with activated sludge exposed to 100 mg o-dichlorobenzene/L under aerobic conditions for 28 days showed that o-dichlorobenzene is not readily biodegradable (MITI, 1992)

Description of key information

A test on biodegradation following OECD Guideline 301C with activated sludge

exposed to 100 mg 1,2-dichlorobenzene/L under aerobic conditions for 28 days showed that 1,2-dichlorobenzene is not readily biodegradable (MITI, 1992).

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Biodegradation in water:
under test conditions no biodegradation observed

Additional information

A test on biodegradation following OECD Guideline 301C with activated sludge exposed to 100 mg 1,2-dichlorobenzene/L under aerobic conditions for 28 days showed that 1,2-dichlorobenzene is not readily biodegradable (MITI, 1992).

However, aerobic biodegradation by adapted microorganisms is possible in the aquatic environment. Biodegradation under anaerobic conditions could not be proved unambiguously.