Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Description of key information

A standard skin irritation test performed with strontium chromate showed no signs of skin irritation.
Strontium chromate was slightly irritating in a standard eye irritation test.
Respiratory irritation (mainly nasal irritation and perforated septum) has traditionally been common among chromate exposed workers.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Skin irritation / corrosion

Endpoint conclusion
Endpoint conclusion:
no adverse effect observed (not irritating)

Eye irritation

Endpoint conclusion
Endpoint conclusion:
no adverse effect observed (not irritating)

Respiratory irritation

Endpoint conclusion
Endpoint conclusion:
adverse effect observed (irritating)

Additional information

No signs of skin irritation were observed in a standard rabbit OECD test. Cases of skin ulceration were, however, reported at a strontium chromate plant with poor hygienic conditions. This report also indicated high chromium concentrations in biomonitoring samples. As only one report from a single factory was available, and it did not clearly describe e.g. what other exposures the workers had, it was concluded that the data obtained in the guideline animal skin irritation test was more reliable. Therefore the standard animal test was selected as key study, and according to the results of the test no classification is suggested for skin irritation.

Strontium chromate was slightly irritating in a standard OECD rabbit eye irritation test. Based on the classification criteria, no classification is required for this substance.

There are no animal data on respiratory irritation caused by chromates. At a strontium chromate plant, with poor hygienic conditions, cases of rhinitis and nasal ulceration were observed. In addition, this report (also referred to under skin irritation) showed increased chromium levels in biomonitoring samples. Also in studies examining signs of respiratory symptoms of chrome platers, the numbers of nasal perforation or ulceration have traditionally been increased, and these have generally been recognized as typical effects of soluble chromates. As there are no standard test methods available for respiratory irritation, and only limited data available, classification for respiratory irritation is suggested based on weight of evidence from occupational reports on various chromates.


Effects on respiratory irritation: irritating

Justification for classification or non-classification

No classification is suggested for skin or eye irritation. This is justified by standard OECD rabbit test for skin irritation and eye irritation which have been performed with strontium chromate.

Classification for respiratory irritation is suggested for strontium chromate based on occupational findings (strontium chromate and other chromates).