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Toxicological information

Acute Toxicity: dermal

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
acute toxicity: dermal
Type of information:
migrated information: read-across from supporting substance (structural analogue or surrogate)
Adequacy of study:
key study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: older study; not conducted in accordance with current GLP guidelines

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
study report
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
1984
Report Date:
1984

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
equivalent or similar to
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 402 (Acute Dermal Toxicity)
GLP compliance:
no
Test type:
standard acute method
Limit test:
yes

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Type:
Constituent

Test animals

Species:
guinea pig
Strain:
Hartley
Sex:
not specified

Administration / exposure

Type of coverage:
occlusive
Vehicle:
unchanged (no vehicle)
Details on dermal exposure:
the abdomens of six guinea pigs were depilated using a depilatory containing barium sulfide, talc, starch, and a commercial laundry detergent, wetted to make a thin paste. Following depilation, the animals were exposed dermally to doses of 1 (one animal), 5 (one animal), 1 0( one animal), or 20(three animals) mL/kg for 24 hours via gauze pads to which the appropriate amount of test substance had been applied. The pads were held in place by impervious rubber dental dam material wrapped around the torso of the animal and secured with rubber cement.
Duration of exposure:
24 hours
Doses:
1, 5, 10, 20 mL/kg
No. of animals per sex per dose:
1 - 3
Control animals:
no
Details on study design:
The skin was evaluated immediately after removal of the wrapping material and one and two weeks later.

Results and discussion

Effect levels
Sex:
not specified
Dose descriptor:
LD50
Effect level:
> 20 mL/kg bw
Based on:
test mat.
Mortality:
none
Clinical signs:
Immediately after the animals were unwrapped, clinical signsof irritation on all six animals included moderate to severe erythema, moderate to gross edema and some evidence of necrosis. At one week, thin, dried eschars covered the entire area of the application site for all six animals. By termination of the 14-day study, the application sites had small, scattered light eschars, desquamation, alopecia, and light scarring. The severity of the signs was not related to dose. All animals gained weight during the study.
Body weight:
At initiation of the study, the guinea pigs weighed between 475 and 593 grams.
Gross pathology:
Necropsies were not conducted

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Interpretation of results:
practically nontoxic
Remarks:
Migrated information Criteria used for interpretation of results: expert judgment
Conclusions:
Based upon the results of this test, the acute dermal LD50 of p-diisopropylbenzene was determined to be greater than 20 mL/kg in guinea pigs.
Executive summary:

In this study the abdomens of six guinea pigs were depilated using a depilatory containing barium sulfide, talc, starch, and a commercial laundry detergent, wetted to make a thin paste. Following depilation, the animals were exposed dermally to doses of 1 (one animal), 5 (one animal), 1 0( one animal), or 20(three animals) mL/kg for 24 hours via gauze pads to which the appropriate amount of test substance had been applied. The pads were held in place by impervious rubber dental dam material wrapped around the torso of the animal and secured with rubber cement. At initiation of the study, the guinea pigs weighed between 475 and 593 grams. The skin was evaluated immediately after removal of the wrapping material and one and two weeks later. Immediately after the animals were unwrapped, clinical signs of irritation on all six animals included moderate to severe erythema, moderate to gross edema and some evidence of necrosis. At one week, thin, dried eschars covered the entire area of the application site for all six animals. By termination of the 14-day study, the application sites had small, scattered light eschars, desquamation, alopecia, and light scarring. The severity of the signs was not related to dose. All animals gained weight during the study. The test substance was rated a moderate irritant under the conditions of this study, and the dermal LD50 was greater than 20 mL/kg. There were no indications of dermal absorption as weight gains were similar across dose levels, and no abnormal clinical signs were noted other than irritation at the application site. This study

was conducted between February 3 and March 3, 1982.