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Toxicological information

Acute Toxicity: oral

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
acute toxicity: oral
Type of information:
migrated information: read-across from supporting substance (structural analogue or surrogate)
Adequacy of study:
key study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: older study; not conducted in accordance with current GLP guidelines

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
study report
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
1984
Report Date:
1984

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
equivalent or similar to
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 401 (Acute Oral Toxicity)
GLP compliance:
no
Test type:
standard acute method
Limit test:
no

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Type:
Constituent
Test material form:
liquid: viscous

Test animals

Species:
rat
Strain:
Sprague-Dawley
Sex:
male/female

Administration / exposure

Route of administration:
oral: gavage
Vehicle:
unchanged (no vehicle)
Doses:
1600, 3200 mg/kg
No. of animals per sex per dose:
four
Control animals:
no
Details on study design:
An acute oral toxicity study was conducted with two groups of four male and four female rats. Animals were fasted overnight prior to administration of the test substance. Dose levels were 1600 and 3200 mg/kg. At study start, animals weighed 170 to 226 grams. The test substance was administered neat by stomach tube.

Results and discussion

Preliminary study:
Immediately after dosing, all animals appeared slightly weak. Slight to moderate weakness and roughened hair coats were noted at one hour, and slight weakness and rough hair coats were noted at two hours after dosing. By four hours after administration of the test substance, no abnormal clinical signs were observed in either sex at either dose level. No further abnormal clinical signs were observed at any time during the fourteen-day observation period. All animals gained weight during the study. No necropsies were conducted.
Effect levelsopen allclose all
Sex:
female
Dose descriptor:
LD50
Effect level:
> 3 200 mg/kg bw
Based on:
test mat.
Sex:
male
Dose descriptor:
LD50
Effect level:
> 3 200 mg/kg bw
Based on:
test mat.
Mortality:
none
Clinical signs:
Immediately after dosing, all animals appeared slightly weak. Slight to moderate weakness and roughened hair coats were noted at one hour, and slight weakness and rough hair coats were noted at two hours after dosing. By four hours after administration of the test substance, no abnormal clinical signs were observed in either sex at either dose level. No further abnormal clinical signs were observed at any time during the fourteen-day observation period.
Body weight:
At study start, animals weighed 170 to 226 grams.
Gross pathology:
No necropsies were conducted

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Interpretation of results:
practically nontoxic
Remarks:
Migrated information Criteria used for interpretation of results: expert judgment
Conclusions:
Based on the results of this study, the acute oral LD50 for p-diisopropylbenzend was greater than 3200 mg/kg in male and female rats.
Executive summary:

An acute oral toxicity study was conducted with two groups of four male and four female rats. Animals were fasted overnight prior to administration of the test substance. Dose levels were 1600 and 3200 mg/kg. At study start, animals weighed 170 to 226 grams. The test substance was administered neat by stomach tube. Immediately after dosing, all animals appeared slightly weak. Slight to moderate weakness and roughened hair coats were noted at one hour, and slight weakness and rough hair coats were noted at two hours after dosing. By four hours after administration of the test substance, no abnormal clinical signs were observed in either sex at either dose level. No further abnormal clinical signs were observed at any time during the fourteen-day observation period. All animals gained weight during the study. No necropsies were conducted. Based on the results of this study, the acute oral LD50 was greater than 3200 mg/kg in male and female rats. This study was conducted between February 5 and March 1, 1982.