Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Hazard for aquatic organisms

Freshwater

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Marine water

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

STP

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no data: aquatic toxicity unlikely

Sediment (freshwater)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Sediment (marine water)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for air

Air

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for terrestrial organisms

Soil

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for predators

Secondary poisoning

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no potential to cause toxic effects if accumulated (in higher organisms) via the food chain

Additional information

Conclusion on classification

Studies performed with the substance

In an acute toxicity study with Daphnia magna, performed in accordance with OECD 202 (draft of 2000) and GLP principles, the substance did not induce acute immobilisation of Daphnia magna, at a concentration present in a 0.45 μm filtered solution prepared at a loading rate of 100 mg/L. The measured concentration of strontium (Sr) was 0.452 mg Sr/L at the start of the test and remained stable during exposure (97.8% of initial). No other elements were measured.

The measured strontium concentration may (also) be due to small particles of the substance that passed through the filter, and is not necessarily due to dissociated strontium ions and/or dissolved test substance. The particle size distribution does show that particles around 0.5 μm are present in the substance.

 

Metal compounds strategy

The substance is an inorganic substance containing the metals strontium, boron and europium. Consequently any classification based on the metals strategy presented in the Guidance on the Application of the CLP criteria should be investigated. In case of this particular substance any classification based on the strontium (Sr), boron (B) and/or europium (EU) ions need to be investigated (considering the rate and extent of transformation/dissolution of these elements from the substance).

Strontium has a low toxicity to freshwater organisms. Most available tests are performed with strontium chloride (which is not classified as hazardous for the environment) with L(E)C50s ranging from 75 to 910 mg Sr/L. There are no chronic no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) for aquatic organisms available (Reference: WHO report on STRONTIUM AND STRONTIUM COMPOUNDS (Concise International Chemical Assessment Document 77); http://www.inchem.org/documents/cicads/cicads/cicad77.pdf). Based on the lowest available acute L(E)C50 of strontium (75 mg Sr/L) and the molecular weights of strontium and of the substance (>1010 g/mole), the acute ERVcompound is >100 mg/L. Based on the low acute toxicity of strontium and the amount of strontium contained in the substance, it is considered justified to conclude that the chronic ERVcompound is >1 mg/L.

Boron also has a low toxicity to freshwater organisms. Many tests are available that have been performed with the substance boric acid, which is also not classified as hazardous for the environment. For fish and Daphnia magna long-term tests are available, with NOECs well above 1 mg B/L. The acute L(E)EC50's are well above 10 mg B/L (Reference: ECHA website). Based on this information and the molecular weights of the element boron (10.81 g/mole) and of the substance (>1010 g/mole), it is considered justified to conclude that the acute and chronic ERVcompound are >100 mg/L and > 1 mg/L, respectively.

As the content of europium in the substance is low (<3%), investigating classification of the substance based on this element is not considered needed.

 

Conclusions

Based on the available information, it is not considered justified to classify the substance for environmental effects.

Performing the study Transformation/Dissolution of Metals and Metal compounds in aqueous media according to Annex 10 of UN GHS is considered scientifically unjustified, because the acute and chronic ERVcompounds, due to the presence of the 2 relevant metals in the substance, have been determined to be >100 mg/L and >1 mg/L, respectively.