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The acute aquatic toxicity of 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, di-C8-10-alkyl esters was determined for three trophic levels (algae, invertebrates, fish). All three tests resulted in no effects up to the limit of water solubility. For the read-across substance 1,2 -Benzenedicarboxylic acid, di-C6-10-alkyl esters aquatic tests were conducted covering only two trophic levels. But the findings were consistent with the results of the target substance, as no effects were found up to the limit of water solubility in an algae and a Daphnia study. A study on the effect towards microorganisms showed that 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, di-C8-10-alkyl esters did not produce any effects up to the limit of water solubility. Supporting these findings, literature data concludes that aquatic toxicity across all trophic levels is limited to the lower molecular weight phthalate esters and higher molecular weight phthalate esters do not exhibit acute or chronic aquatic toxicity (Staples et al., 1997).

For the chronic aquatic toxicity, studies with the read across substances 1,2 -Benzenedicarboxylic acid, di-C6-10-alkyl-esters, 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, diundecyl ester, 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, dihexyl ester, and 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, dioctyl ester are cited in the literature for different trophic levels.

Rhodes et al. (1995) cite several studies for phthalate esters and report for 1,2 -Benzenedicarboxylic acid, dihexyl ester and 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, diundecyl ester that in rainbow trout no effects were observed on either survival or growth in the ELS studies up to the highest concentration tested. For 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, diundecyl ester the NOEC (21d ) for reproduction and survival inDaphnia magnawas reported as 0.059 mg/L at the highest concentration tested. The 21d-NOEC stated for 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, di-C6-10-alkyl-esters and 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, dihexyl ester are 0.10 mg/L and 0.084 mg/l, respectively (Rhodes et al., 1995), All values are well above the level of water solubility (see Staples et al., 1997) and whenever effects were observed, it was due to the use of solvents. The same observations were made for 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, dioctyl ester in Daphnia with a reported 21d-NOEC of 0.32 mg/L and in fish (Pimephales promelas) with a reported 28d-NOEC of 3.2 mg/L (McCarthy and Whitmore, 1985).

The available algae studies for 1,2 -Benzenedicarboxylic acid, di-C8-10-alkyl-esters and 1,2 -Benzenedicarboxylic acid, di-C6-10-alkyl-esters

did not find any effects up to the highest concentration tested, as mentioned above. Supporting these findings, the NOEC in algae (Raphidocelis subcapitata) are reported by Adams et al. (1995) for 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, di-C6-10-alkyl-esters, 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, dihexyl ester, and 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, diundecyl ester as >0.08 mg/L, >0.33 mg/L and >2.10 mg/L, respectively. Again, all values are well above the limit of water solubility.

These results together with the overall data on the toxicity and water solubility of phthalate esters in general clearly show that the higher phthalate esters do not induce any chronic aquatic toxicity in the range of their water solubility. Several studies report findings of toxicity, but only when solvents were used and any effect values are clearly above the limit of water solubility.

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