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Environmental fate & pathways

Biodegradation in soil

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Description of key information

Two published studies are available which relate to laboratory studies undertaken on behalf of the Canadian Chemicals Management Plan testing programme. Princz et al (2014) is primarily a bioaccumulation study and reports half lives for the test substance in sandy and clay loam soils of 11 and 46 days, respectively. In soil toxicity studies by Ritchie et al (2013) it was concluded that the test substance was persistent with an average recovery of 77% at test end.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Half-life in soil:
46 d
at the temperature of:
20 °C

Additional information

Two published studies are available which relate to laboratory studies undertaken on behalf of the Canadian Chemicals Management Plan testing programme. The key study is by Princz et al (2014) and is primarily an environmental fate study with a focus on bioaccumulation. The authors report half lives for the test substance in sandy and clay loam soils of 11 and 46 days, respectively. In order to be precautionary, the longest half life is taken to represent potential persistence across a range of natural soils in this risk assessment. A half life of 46 days (or less) does not meet or exceed the persistence criterion of 120 days or more and the test substance is not classified for persistence in soil.

The supporting study by Ritchie et al (2013) reported the results from a series of soil toxicity tests with earthworm, Collembola and terrestrial plants. The test durations varied depending on the organism being tested with the longest duration being 63 days.

In soil toxicity studies by Ritchie et al (2013) it was concluded that the test substance was persistent with an average recovery of 77% at test end.