Registration Dossier

Environmental fate & pathways

Endpoint summary

Administrative data

Description of key information

Hydrolysis:

The half life of hydrolysis of test chemical Prussian blue (CAS no. 14038-43-8) was determined to be 1000 years so it is concluded that test test chemical prussin blue has negligible hydrolysis.

Biodegradation:

In accordance with column 2 of Annex VII of the REACH regulation, testing for this end point is technically not feasible and does not need to be conducted since the test prussian blue is inorganic.

Transport and distribution:

Adsorption:The target chemical Prussian blue is strongly adsorbed to geolite. Goethite is common component of soil.

Additional information

Hydrolysis:

The half life of hydrolysis of test chemical Prussian blue (CAS no. 14038-43-8) was determined to be 1000 years so it is concluded that test test chemical prussin blue has negligible hydrolysis.

Biodegradation:

In accordance with column 2 of Annex VII of the REACH regulation, testing for this end point is technically not feasible and does not need to be conducted since the test prussian blue is inorganic.

Transport and distribution:

Adsorption:

The target chemical Prussian blue is hydrolyzed at higher pH values, the liberated hexacyanoferrate ions are strongly sorbed at the iron oxide hydroxides that already exist in the soil or that have just been formed by hydrolysis of the Prussian blue.

The results obtained indicate that the interaction of Prussian blue colloids and of dissolved hexacyanoferrate ions with goethite can strongly retard the transport processes of these compounds in soils. These processes help to immobilize Prussian blue in soils. Since free cyanide ions quickly form hexacyanoferrate ions with the ubiquitous iron ions of the soil, the iron ions are also responsible for trapping damped cyanides in soils. Goethite is found all over the planet, usually in the form of concretions, stalactitic formations, oolites (a form consisting of tiny round grains cemented together), reniform (kidney shapes) or botryoidal (globular, like bunches of grapes) accumulations.

The target chemical Prussian blue is strongly adsorbed to geolite. Goethite is common component of soil.