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Description of key information

No human data are available and no specific toxicokinetic (TK) study using Trifluoromethanesulphonic acid has been performed.
Based on the data currently available in the data set, both from the physico-chemical properties and toxicological data, absorption and distribution of the substance following oral exposure was suggested by the occurrence of some organs changes (kidney, liver, spleen) observed in rats administered with Trifluoromethanesulphonic acid.
Considering its low vapor pressure, Trifluoromethanesulphonic acid may be absorbed through the lungs by inhalation in low quantities but its respiratory irritation properties are making relevant exposition unlikely.
Considering its strong corrosive properties, dermal absorption cannot be evaluated.
The parent substance is not expected to be metabolized.
No indication of the test substance excretion was obtained but it is expected that Trifluoromethanesulphonic acid is excreted in the urine.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Bioaccumulation potential:
no bioaccumulation potential

Additional information

No human data are available and no specific toxicokinetic (TK) study usingTrifluoromethanesulphonicacid has been performed. Therefore, the assessment of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of Trifluoromethanesulphonic acid is based on the physico-chemical properties of the test substance and on the results of the available toxicity studies.

 

Physico-chemical properties:

- The test substance has a low volatility with a vapor pressure of 240 Pa at 20°C.

- The estimated partition coefficient in n-octanol/water is <0.3.

- The estimated water solubility is 1604 g/L.

- Molecular Weight: 150.08 g/mol

 

Absorption

Inhalation route

The substance has a low volatility as evidenced by the vapor pressure value, 240Pa at 20°C, and thus may be absorbed through inhalation but in limited quantities. However, because of its corrosive properties and respiratory tract irritating properties, prolonged exposition and absorption by inhalation is highly unlikely.

Oral route

In an acute oral toxicity (Longobardi, 2003) with groups of 3 rats per dose mortality was 0 and 100 % with doses of 500 and 2000 mg/kg respectively. The animals treated with 500 mg/kg showed piloerection following dosing (recovery was observed within 3 days) and nothing was noted at necropsy. The animals treated with 2000 mg/kg died within 48 hours after showing piloerection, reduced activity/lethargy, hunched posture and pallor. The necropsy revealed that the abdominal cavity of 2 rats and the thoracic cavity of one dosed with 2000 mg/kg bw contained a clear fluid material. Furthermore the jejunum of one animal contained a yellow mucoid material. 

In another acute oral toxicity study (KOBAYASHI, 1988) male rats (10/dose) were given a single oral dose of Trifluoromethanesulphonic acid by gavage. No rats died at 539, 700 and 910 mg/kg bw whereas 1/10, 6/10 and 7/10 animals died when dosed at 1138, 1538 and 2000 mg/kg bw respectively. Decrease in spontaneous movement, crawling, sedation and emaciation were observed but were reversible.

All animals treated at 1183 mg/kg bw and more showed suppression of weight gain during the study.

Gastric erosion, scarring, thickening, adhesion of the stomach and liver and thickening of the duodenum were observed at necropsy. Histopathological examinations revealed submucosal cellular infiltration in the stomach and small intestine. In strongly stimulated cases, adhesion of the stomach and liver reaching the muscle layer, serous membrane, and outside the serous membrane was observed. An extreme decrease in lymphocytes in the spleen was also observed. 

 

In a 28 days sub-acute toxicity study (Kanji YAMASAKI, 1995), Trifluoromethanesulfonic acid was administered by gavage at dose levels of 0, 8, 40, 200 and 1000 mg/kg body weight/day to groups of 6 male and 6 female rats (plus a control and 1000 mg/kg recovery groups). No death occurred during the study.

No treatment related changes were detected for body weight, food consumption and urinalysis.

Some minor changes were observed in hematological parameters with both males 200 and 1000 mg/kg bw/day and in clinical chemistry for 1000 mg/kg recovery group (males and females).

Some slight changes were observed in kidney and liver weight (relative or absolute). At necropsy and during histopathological examination important changes were observed on the forestomach at the high dose. Other occasional minor changes were observed on the stomach, duodenum, liver, kidney and spleen. In every case these effects are decreasing in the recovery groups.

 

Consequently most of the observations made during oral toxicity studies are related to local effects or local effects consequences. However some effects (liver or kidney changes) should be related to metabolism and/or elimination of Trifluoromethanesulphonic acid are indicative of the occurrence of gastrointestinal absorption.

 

Dermal Route

As Trifluoromethanesulphonic acid is corrosive to the skin, it is not relevant to evaluate its dermal penetration. 

 

Distribution 

During the rat 28 days oral toxicity some slight effects were observed on the liver, kidney and spleen in addition to local effects or consequences of local effects (see above). 

This result, together with the very high water solubility seems indicative of a systemic distribution at least in the hydrophilic tissues. 

 

Metabolisation 

Trifluoromethanesulphonic acidis not expected to be metabolized.

Several in-vitro genotoxicity studies were performed in presence or absence of metabolic activation. However, as the results were negative with or without metabolic activation in every tests, these result are not conclusive concerning metabolisation. 

 

Excretion 

Owing to the low molecular weight and the high water solubility of Trifluoromethanesulphonic acidit is possibly excreted in the urine. 

 

Conclusion 

Based on the data currently available in the data set, both from the physico-chemical properties and toxicological data, absorption and distribution of the substance following oral exposure was suggested by the occurrence of some organs changes (kidney, liver, spleen) observed in rats administered with Trifluoromethanesulphonic acid. 

Considering its low vapor pressure, Trifluoromethanesulphonic acid may be absorbed through the lungs by inhalation in low quantities but its respiratory irritation properties are making relevant exposition unlikely. 

Considering its strong corrosive properties, dermal absorption cannot be evaluated.

 

The parent substance is not expected to be metabolized.

 

No indication of the test substance excretion was obtained but it is expected that Trifluoromethanesulphonic acid is excreted in the urine.