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Toxicological information

Exposure related observations in humans: other data

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
exposure-related observations in humans: other data
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: In this record studies on acute inhalation toxicity and CNS effects of vinyl chloride in humans are combined. The studies have been published in peer-reviewed literature and are considered adequate for assessment.

Data source

Referenceopen allclose all

Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Effects of single and repeated exposures of humans and rats to vinyl chloride.
Author:
Lester, D., Greenberg, L.A. and Adams, W.R.
Year:
1963
Bibliographic source:
Am Ind Hyg Assoc J 24:265-275
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Toxicology Update: Vinyl Chloride
Author:
Easter, M.D., Von Burg, R.
Year:
1994
Bibliographic source:
J Appl Toxicol 14:301-307
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Accidental Poisoning by Vinyl Chloride: Report of Two Cases
Author:
Danziger H.
Year:
1960
Bibliographic source:
Canad. M.A.J. 82, 828 - 830

Materials and methods

Endpoint addressed:
acute toxicity: inhalation

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent

Results and discussion

Any other information on results incl. tables

Method

Three men (26, 35, 50 years; 86, 78, 71 kg) and three women (25, 40, 55 years; 64, 52 61 kg) were exposed twice each day (separated by a 6-hour interval) for 3 successive days to six different concentrations of vinyl chloride: 0.0, 0.4, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6 and 2.0% (at random) via a plastic breathing mask affixed over the face (covering the mouth and nose). The rate of air or air-gas mixture was sufficient (50 litres per min) to prevent any dilution effects from the atmosphere.  Exposures were terminated after 5 minutes and the subjects were asked to compare their feelings before and after taking off the masks.

Results

One subject reported feeling dizzy after 0% and 0.8% (same subject).  No effects were noted at 0.4%.  Two out of the 6 reported dizziness at 1.2%.  Five out of 6 reported dizziness, light-headedness, nausea, and dulling of visual and auditory cues at 1.6%, (which disappeared after cessation of exposure).  All subjects were intoxicated by 2.0%.  The same symptoms were observed as those caused by 1.6%, although they appeared earlier in the exposure and were more intense.  One subject reported a headache that persisted for 30 minutes.
According to the authors, the maximum concentration causing no effect in any subject lies between 0.8 and 1.2% (8000-12,000 ppm).

Reference:

Lester, D., Greenberg et al.(1963)

 

Method

Two experimenters were exposed to a VC concentration of 2.5 % for three minutes.

Results

Reversible dizziness, slight disorientation, burning sensation of the feet. Immediate recovery upon leaving the chamber. Slight headache for about 30 minutes.
Reference:

Easter M.D. et al. (1994)

Methods

Accidental exposure of three workers (VC polymerization plant) is reported.

Results

Two of the workers were found dead on the plant (unrelated cases). Autopsy did not reveal any specific diagnostic features. One person recovered after experiencing symptoms of a narcotic effect.

Reference

Danziger H. (1960)

Applicant's summary and conclusion