Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Endpoint:
basic toxicokinetics
Type of information:
not specified
Reliability:
4 (not assignable)
Data waiving:
other justification
Justification for data waiving:
other:

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
secondary source
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
1992

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline followed
Guideline:
other: not applicable
Deviations:
not specified
GLP compliance:
not specified

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Test material form:
not specified
Details on test material:
not applicable

Test animals

Species:
other: not applicable
Strain:
not specified
Sex:
not specified

Administration / exposure

Route of administration:
dermal
Vehicle:
not specified
Control animals:
other: not applicable

Results and discussion

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Interpretation of results (migrated information): other: Sa 190 might be able to penetrate the skin to a limited extent
Sa 190 might be able to penetrate the skin to a limited extent
Executive summary:

There are no dermal penetration/absorption studies available for Sa 190. Dermal penetration strongly depends on the molecular weight of a substance and its lipophilic properties. Typically a molecular weight above 500 prevents a substance from penetrating the skin. The lipophilic properties of a chemical are indicated by the octanol-water partition coefficient (log Kow). Substances with a molecular weight below 500 and log Kowvalues between +1.0 and +4.0 are assumed to be able to penetrate the skin. Log Kowvalues below +1.0 or above +4.0 indicate decreasing penetration ability while log Kowvalues below -1.0 or above +6.0 suggests that a substance is not likely to penetrate the skin*.

Sa 190 has a molecular weight of 423.72 and a log Pow of >5.7. According to this data it must be considered that Sa 190 might be able to penetrate the skin, though to a limited extent. There is no information available to predict the fate of Sa 190 after dermal penetration. However, taking into account its physico-chemical properties it is likely to become degraded by releasing its starting monomers.

 

*Basic principles according to: US-EPA “Dermal Exposure Assessment: Principles and Applications”. EPA/600/8-91-011B, January 1992