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Toxicological information

Acute Toxicity: dermal

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
acute toxicity: dermal
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
weight of evidence
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: collection of data

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
other company data
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
1975

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline followed
Principles of method if other than guideline:
Occlusive treatment of Albino rabbits, no further specification
GLP compliance:
not specified
Limit test:
no

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Details on test material:
no data

Test animals

Species:
rabbit
Strain:
other: Albino
Sex:
male

Administration / exposure

Type of coverage:
occlusive
Vehicle:
not specified
Duration of exposure:
24 h
Doses:
0.10, 0.20, 2.0 ml/kg
No. of animals per sex per dose:
2-4
Control animals:
not specified

Results and discussion

Effect levels
Sex:
male
Dose descriptor:
LD50
Effect level:
0.126 mL/kg bw
95% CL:
0.077 - 0.206
Remarks on result:
other: cooresponds to 133.6 mg/kg bw

Any other information on results incl. tables

Dose (ml/kg)

Dead/dosed

Days to death

Skin irritation

Signs and/or symptoms of toxicity

2.0

2/2

0,1

necrosis

Anaesthesia, eyes dark at 1 h

0.20

4/4

1,1,2,2

necrosis

Prostate at 1 day

0.1

1/4

2

necrosis

Very lethargic at 1 day

Gross pathology of victims: lungs, livers and spleens congested; kidneys very dark; livers nottled; bladders filled with bloody urine; in survivors no remarkable findings

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Interpretation of results:
highly toxic
Remarks:
Migrated information
Conclusions:
Cumene hydroperoxide was highly toxic following acute covered dermal application
Executive summary:

Cumene hydroperoxide was tested for acute dermal toxicity in rabbits (skin penetration); the LD50 was 0.126 ml/kg (cooresponds to 133.6 mg/kg bw); the signs of toxicity were anaesthesia, prostate and lethargy