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Waste Framework Directive - SCIP database

Background

What is the SCIP database?

The revised Waste Framework Directive 2008/98/EC, which entered into force in July 2018, provided a role for ECHA to establish and maintain a database with information on substances of concern in articles, as such or in complex objects (products), named as “SCIP database”. 

The information will be submitted by companies supplying articles containing SVHCs on the Candidate List placed on the EU market. The SCIP database will ensure that this information is available throughout the whole lifecycle of articles and materials, including at the waste stage.

What are the objectives of the SCIP database and how can it contribute to a more circular economy?

The three main objectives of the SCIP database to support the circular economy are the following:

1. Decrease the generation of waste containing hazardous substances by supporting the substitution of substances of concern in articles placed on the EU market. 
2. Make information available to further improve waste treatment operations.
3. Allow authorities to monitor the use of substances of concern in articles and initiate appropriate actions over the whole lifecycle of articles, including at their waste stage.

The primary goal remains the substitution of the Candidate List substances of very high concern in articles with safer alternatives, and thus preventing the generation of waste containing those hazardous substances.

The information available in the SCIP database will support waste operators to improve their waste separation and recycling techniques and processes over time, based on the increased knowledge of which substances are present in which articles. Waste operators do not currently have sufficient information about hazardous substances in the waste they are processing –leading, in the worst case– to such substances being incorporated in recycled materials. The database aims to bridge the current gap in the information flow.

The increased transparency will also benefit consumers and give them the opportunity to make better informed purchase decisions, as well as give them transparent information on safe use and disposal advice for articles on the EU market. Finally, improved knowledge of the presence and use of substances of concern will benefit authorities in their regulatory work.

Ultimately, the database should facilitate the transition to a more sustainable material management by increasing the efficiency of resource use, and ensuring waste is valued as a resource.

Where is this new obligation for suppliers of articles coming from?
The Article 9(1)(i) of the Waste Framework Directive 2008/98/EC  extends the REACH Article 33  duties of suppliers of articles to communicate, under certain conditions, information about the presence of Candidate List substances in their articles down the supply chain and to consumers (upon request) , by requiring them to submit that information also to ECHA.
 
These obligations of the Directive will also be transposed into the national law of the EU Member States.
 
Further information:
Which articles and substances are within the scope of the obligation?

The obligation covers all articles placed on the EU market containing a substance of very high concern on the Candidate List in a concentration above 0.1% w/w. 

Substances fulfilling one or more of the criteria defined in REACH Article 57 can be identified  as Substances of Very High Concern (SVHCs) and put on the Candidate List  for authorisation. New substances are regularly added to the Candidate List, usually twice a year.

The obligation applies to any article as such or in a complex object, i.e. an object made up of more than one article, because articles that are assembled or joined together remain articles. Furthermore, an import is deemed to be ‘placing on the market’, thus any imported article into the EU is covered by the obligation, including any supply via internet sales that involve an import.     

The obligation covers articles, as such or in complex objects, as they are supplied, including “spare parts”. Articles or complex objects that are repaired, provided that they are not supplied, are not covered by the legal duty.  

Information on articles supplied directly and exclusively to consumers, without the participation of a distributor or other actor in the supply chain, will not be included in the SCIP database, as any direct supply to consumers is not covered by the legal obligation.

Further information:

https://echa.europa.eu/substances-of-very-high-concern-identification-explained

https://echa.europa.eu/candidate-list-table

Is there any exemption in the interest of defence?

Where necessary, in the interests of defence, Member States may allow for exemptions from the REACH Regulation in specific cases for certain substances on their own, in a mixture or in an article (Article 2(3) of the REACH Regulation). 

Therefore, in case a Member State considers that the reporting obligations are detrimental to its national interests in the area of defence, then a Member State may choose to invoke this article to provide a specific exemption from the obligation of Article 33(1) of REACH, and to Article 9(1)(i) of the WFD respectfully. Furthermore, Member States are not obliged to supply information the disclosure of which they consider to be contrary to the essential interests of its security (Article 346 TFEU1).

Notes: 
1 Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union.

(source: Commission non-paper on the implementation of articles 9(1)(i) and 9(2) of the revised Waste Framework Directive 2008/98/EC, distributed to the CARACAL and Waste Expert Group in June 2019, ref. Ares(2019)3936110).

Is the obligation of providing information to the SCIP database an additional burden for duty holders?

Duty holders only need to provide information on those articles which contain Candidate List substances. The vast majority of articles on the EU market do not contain them.

Substitution remains the overall goal: the most hazardous substances should be phased out over time. 

The information required for the SCIP database must already be communicated throughout the supply chain under REACH Article 33(1). The SCIP database therefore complements the existing communication and notification obligations for Candidate List substances in articles under Articles 33 and 7(2) of REACH, and should reinforce compliance with them.

ECHA is exploring the possibility of using the information already submitted by the upstream supplier to allow duty holders to refer to each other’s notifications in case it concerns the same article, thereby reducing administrative burden and avoiding duplications.

ECHA will also provide for a system-to-system submission solution which will automate the submission process for these articles. Companies will be able to connect their supply chain tracking tools to ECHA’s database to set up automated submission procedures and avoid manual work. 

Since the beginning of the project, ECHA has been in contact with several industry sectors and supply chain communication-tool providers to understand the needs and existing practices.

 

Does submitting SCIP notifications mean that I am fulfilling the communication obligations under REACH Article 33(1)?

No , they are different obligations. From 5 January 2021 onwards , companies are still required to comply with their communication and notification obligations under Articles 33 and 7(2) of the REACH Regulation. A supplier of an article which contain such a substance of very high concern in the Candidate List in a concentration above 0.1% (weight by weight) must provide enough information to allow the safe use of the article to  to costumers, i.e. industrial or professional users and distributors, according to REACH Art. 33(1). Consumers can request similar information. The supplier of the article has to provide this information within 45 days, free of charge. Producers and importers of articles have to notify to ECHA the substances listed on the Candidate list which are present in their articles, if all the conditions are met, according to REACH Article 7(2).

The SCIP notification obligation under the Waste Framework Directive is aimed to ‘ensure that the information about the presence of substances of very high concern is available throughout the whole life cycle of products and materials, including at the waste stage’ (emphasis added, see recital 38 of the Directive (EU) 2018/851). It complements the already existing obligations under REACH. For more information see Q&A 1605.

The aim of Article 33 is to ensure that sufficient information is communicated down the supply chain to allow the safe use of articles by actors in the supply chain, professional and industrial end-users and consumers. The information flow along the supply chain enables all operators to take, at their stage of the use of the article, the appropriate risk management measures to guarantee the safe use of articles containing Candidate List substances. The information should also allow the operators in the supply chain and consumers to make informed purchase choices on the articles they buy. Finally, the notification obligation of importers and producers of articles under Article 7(2) of REACH aims at providing ECHA and the Member State competent authorities with information on the presence of Candidate List substances in articles, which may be used to identify a need for initiating further regulatory risk management procedures under REACH (authorisation and restriction) or under other EU legislation. Of course, the SCIP database will also support these objectives by improving transparency on the presence of Candidate List substances in articles, but the main additional value of the database is that the SCIP data is also available to support waste operators to improve their waste separation and recycling techniques and processes over time. 

For further information see the Candidate List substances in articles under REACHUse your right to ask and the SCIP database.

Do suppliers in the EEA have to make SCIP notifications?
ECHA understands  that Directive 2018/851 of 30 May 2018 amending Directive 2008/98/EC on waste is still under scrutiny for incorporation into the EEA Agreement. For more information you are advised to contact the relevant EEA institutions.
Does packaging need to be notified to SCIP database?

Substances, mixtures and articles can be contained inside packaging, such as a carton, a plastic wrapping or a tin can. Packaging is to be considered as an article because its shape, surface or design is more important than its chemical composition for its functions. The packaging is not a part of the substance, mixture or article being packaged. It is therefore to be considered as a separate article under REACH and the same requirements apply to it as for any other article.

Furthermore, in complex objects, several articles can be joined or assembled together in various manners. A “complex object” refers to any object made up of more than one article. This does not necessarily exclude the possibility that in certain situations packaging may be one of those articles (e.g. a bottle, the can component in a spray can). Articles that are assembled or joined together remain articles, as long as they keep a special shape, surface or design, which is more decisive for their function than their chemical composition. 

Any packaging or packaging components employed to package a substance, mixture or article is an article itself or a complex object and is subject to SCIP notification if that article or any of the articles incorporated in that complex object contains a Candidate List substance in a concentration above 0.1% w/w. For further information see Q&A 516.

Do medical devices fall under the SCIP notification obligation?

A medical device is subject to a SCIP notification obligation if that medical device itself or one of its components:
- fulfils the REACH definition of article, and
- contains a substance of very high concern (SVHC) on the Candidate List in a concentration above 0.1% w/w.
The assessment on whether a medical device itself or one (or more) of its components, can be considered an article under REACH needs to be done on a case-by-case basis after identifying the function of the object. The identification of the function and the assessment should be done by applying the principles contained in Chapter 2 of the Guidance on requirements for substances in articles, taking into account the worked examples therein (e.g. Appendices 3 and 4).

The exemption in REACH Article 2(6)(c) is only relevant for the provisions under Title IV of REACH that are applicable to mixtures. Article 33 is included under the same title of REACH, but it is applicable to articles as defined in Article 3(3) of REACH. Therefore, the exemption from Title IV of certain medical devices that are mixtures is not relevant in this context. 
As a result, there is no exemption from the duty to communicate information under Article 33 of REACH for suppliers of medical devices fulfilling the REACH definition of article or incorporating a component fulfilling that definition, if it contains a Candidate List substance above 0.1% w/w. A supplier of a medical device fulfilling the REACH definition of article or incorporating a component fulfilling that definition is not exempted of the communication obligations under Article 33(1) and is therefore also not exempted of the SCIP notification obligation under Article 9(1)(i) of the Waste Framework Directive.

Duty holders

Which suppliers of articles have the obligation to provide information to ECHA?
The following suppliers of articles need to provide information to ECHA:
- EU producers and assemblers, 
- EU importers, 
- EU distributors of articles and other actors who place articles on the market. 
 
Retailers1 and other supply chain actors supplying articles directly to consumers are not covered by the obligation to provide information to ECHA.
 
According to Article 3(33) of the REACH Regulation, the supplier of an article means ''any producer or importer of an article, any distributor or other actor in the supply chain who places an article on the market".
 
The obligation to provide information to ECHA starts with the first supplier (producer/importer2), because they have or should have the best knowledge of the article. Concerning other suppliers further down in the supply chain (such as distributors who are not importers), a pragmatic approach may be sought as regards to the way they fulfil their obligation, such as making reference to information already submitted by the upstream supplier. Such an approach would avoid double reporting and thereby limit unnecessary administrative burden for both duty holders and authorities.
 
Notes:
1 Excluding retailers who are importers and/or producers.
2 Including distributors who are also importers.
 
(source: Commission non-paper on the implementation of articles 9(1)(i) and 9(2) of the revised Waste Framework Directive 2008/98/EC, distributed to the CARACAL and Waste Expert Group in June 2019, ref. Ares(2019)3936110).

 

What if I am an articles supplier from outside of the EU?

The responsibility for fulfilling the obligation of providing information to ECHA lies with the EU importers. 

Companies outside of the EU are not subject to this obligation and are not allowed to submit SCIP notifications.

Importers of articles in the EU however, need to turn to their non-EU suppliers of articles and request information that they need to fulfil their regulatory obligations, such as the obligation to provide information to the SCIP database. As a non-EU supplier of articles, you should support your EU customers by providing them the necessary information about the presence of Candidate List substances in your supplied articles.

An EU importer may set up contractual agreements with their non-EU suppliers of articles to act on their behalf (as a ‘foreign user’1), regarding the submission of data to the SCIP database. However, the responsibility of the SCIP notification and its content still lies with the EU importer of articles. Please be aware that the third party users (‘foreign user’1) will see the same information as all other users in the ECHA IT Tools.

Notes:
1 A ‘foreign user’ is an external user from company B who has been appointed by the Legal Entity manager from company A to work for company A. A foreign user can perform actions on behalf of the company that grants him permission to use an account from their own ECHA account. Granting access to third party users (foreign users) will allow them to see the same information as all other users. It is important that companies agree the scope of access and how for example confidential information is handled. For more information on the ‘foreign user’, please consult Q&A 960 and the ECHA Accounts Manual.

Who is responsible for the enforcement of this legal duty?
The obligations of the Waste Framework Directive will be transposed into the national law of each EU Member State, the enforcement of which is the responsibility of these Member States.
Information requirements and confidentiality

What information needs to be communicated to ECHA?

The information required for the SCIP database must already be communicated throughout the supply chain under REACH Article 33(1). Therefore, besides administrative contact details, suppliers of articles need to submit the following information to ECHA:

- information that allows the identification of the article;
- the name, concentration range and location of the Candidate List substance(s) present in that article; and
- other information to allow the safe use of the article, notably information to ensure proper management of the article once it becomes waste. 

Duty holders can provide further information on a voluntary basis.

A detailed list of all information requirements is given in the "Detailed Information Requirements" document:     

Article 9(1)(i) of the revised Directive 2008/98/EC on waste (hereafter referred to as the Waste Framework Directive or the WFD1) requires "that any supplier of an article as defined in point 33 of Article 3 of Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council provides the information pursuant to Article 33(1) of that Regulation to the European Chemicals Agency as from 5 January 2021".

According to Article 33(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 (the REACH Regulation): "Any supplier of an article containing a substance meeting the criteria in Article 572and identified in accordance with Article 59(1)3 in a concentration above 0,1 % weight by weight (w/w) shall provide the recipient of the article with sufficient information, available to the supplier, to allow safe use of the article including, as a minimum, the name of that substance".

An objective4 of Article 33(1) of the REACH Regulation is to enable supply chain actors to manage the risks arising from the use of articles containing substances of very high concern (SVHC) that are put on the "Candidate List"5.

Article 9(2) of the WFD provides that information pursuant to Article 33(1) has to be included in a database to be used primarily by waste treatment operators. The information made available to those operators via the database has to be useful for the waste treatment phase of the article’s lifecycle, and enable the identification and effective treatment of waste containing SVHC, as laid down in recital 38 of the WFD elaborating the objective of the database:

"When products, materials and substances become waste, the presence of hazardous substances may render that waste unsuitable for recycling or the production of secondary raw materials of high quality… It is necessary to promote measures to reduce the content of hazardous substances in materials and products, including recycled materials, and to ensure that sufficient information about the presence of hazardous substances and especially substances of very high concern is communicated throughout the whole life cycle of products and materials. In order to achieve those objectives, it is necessary to improve the coherence among the law of the Union on waste, on chemicals and on products and to provide a role for the European Chemicals Agency to ensure that the information about the presence of substances of very high concern is available throughout the whole life cycle of products and materials, including at the waste stage.” 

In view of these elements, the information to be provided to ECHA based on Articles 9(1)(i) and (2) of the WFD has to include information available to the supplier that allows: 
- the identification of the article; 
- the SVHC in the article, its concentration range and its location, as appropriate; and 
- possibly any other information on the safe use of the article, notably information which is necessary to ensure proper management of the article once it becomes waste. 

Therefore, the minimum available information which the supplier has to communicate to ECHA consists of: 
i) information relevant to the identification of the article; 
ii) name, concentration range and location of the SVHC; 
iii) where information in point ii) is not sufficient, other information on the safe use of the article, in particular, available information that is relevant to ensure proper management of the article as waste. 

ECHA may envisage the possibility for the supplier to provide other information on a voluntary basis. 

ECHA has implemented this approach in the "Detailed Information Requirements" document for the database.

1 Directive (EU) 2018/851 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 30 May 2018 amending Directive 2008/98/EC on waste
2 Article 57 defines criteria for substances to be included in the Candidate List.
3 Article 59 sets out the procedure for the purpose of identifying substances meeting the criteria referred to in Article 57 and establishing a Candidate List.
4 Further details on the aim of REACH Article 33, please see subchapter 3.2.1 of the Guidance on requirements for substances in articles and paragraphs 77 and 78 of the judgment of the Court of Justice in case C-106/14.  
5 See recitals 56 and 58 of the REACH Regulation

(source: Commission non-paper on the implementation of articles 9(1)(i) and 9(2) of the revised Waste Framework Directive 2008/98/EC, distributed to the CARACAL and Waste Expert Group in June 2019, ref. Ares(2019)3936110).

 

Why is information requested at article level?
According to the legal provisions of Article 9(1)(i) of the Waste Framework Directive and of REACH Article 33(1), the information to be provided to the SCIP database should be on the article, as such or in a complex object, containing the Candidate List substance. 
 
This interpretation follows the conclusions of the judgment of the Court of Justice in case C-106/14.     
Will ECHA publish the data submitted into the SCIP database and what about confidential business information?

The information submitted to the SCIP database will be publicly available and therefore readily available to waste operators to bridge the current gap in the information flow. 

ECHA will publish the information, as received, on its website. The quality of the data remains the responsibility of each duty holder.

At the same time, ECHA will ensure the protection of confidential business information where justified. For example, the required mandatory data that allow to establish links between actors in the same supply chain will not be made publicly available.

Timelines

From which date should information be communicated to ECHA?

As from 5 January 2021, information on articles containing SVHCs (on the Candidate List) in a concentration above 0.1 % w/w placed on the EU market needs to be notified to ECHA.

According to Article 9(1)(i) of the Waste Framework Directive (WFD1), suppliers should provide to ECHA the information pursuant to Article 33(1) of REACH Regulation from 5 January 2021 onwards. The revised WFD entered into force on 4 July 2018 and will have to be transposed into national law by Member States by 5 July 2020. Member States should ensure national rules are in place to oblige all suppliers to provide information to ECHA as from 5 January 2021

The information requirements of the database are available on the ECHA website in order to guarantee full transparency towards the stakeholders, allow sufficient time to adapt their IT systems, where necessary, and enable them to prepare their notifications in due time before 5 January 2021.

Source: Commission non-paper on the implementation of articles 9(1)(i) and 9(2) of the revised Waste Framework Directive 2008/98/EC, distributed to the CARACAL and Waste Expert Group in June 2019, ref. Ares(2019)3936110).

1 Directive (EU) 2018/851 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 30 May 2018 amending Directive 2008/98/EC on waste

From which date should information be communicated to ECHA concerning substances added to the Candidate List after 5 January 2021?

After 5 January 2021, if substances present in an article as such or in a complex object placed on the EU market in a concentration above 0.1 % w/w are added to the Candidate List, the supplier of that article need to submit a new SCIP notification under Article 9(1)(i) of the Waste Framework Directive or update a previous submitted SCIP notification for that article at the time of the next supply or placement on the market to any customer or as a result of an import, after the substance has been included in the Candidate List.

The Guidance on requirements for substances in articles, in its subchapter 3.2.1 concerning the communication obligation down the supply chain (under Art. 33(1)), mentions that the "information is to be provided to the recipient of the article when the article is supplied for the first time after the inclusion of the substance into the Candidate List". Therefore, a SCIP notification should also be submitted to ECHA when the article is placed on the EU market for the first time after the inclusion of the substance into the Candidate List.  

For further information see the Guidance on requirements for substances in articles.

Tools for preparing and submitting information

Which tools will be available for preparing and submitting information to the SCIP database?
ECHA will make available the submission tools for preparing and submitting information to the SCIP database. The submissions to the SCIP database can be prepared in the most suitable way, depending on your specific business needs and your IT systems:
 
- Online in IUCLID Cloud;
- Offline in IUCLID;
- Using a IUCLID-compatible dedicated format for SCIP submissions in your company’s own system.
 
The information to the SCIP database (dossiers) can be submitted through the ECHA Submission portal in one of two ways:
- Online through the ECHA Submission portal;
- Through a system-to-system (S2S) transfer from the company’s own system to the ECHA Submission portal for submissions (dossiers) created in your own system.
Who will perform validation checks on the information contained in my dossier?
Besides an automated data validation, ECHA does not perform any other checks  on the dossiers submitted to the portal. However, ECHA’s IT tools allow you to validate your own information before you submit in a validation report. Regardless of the support offered by ECHA’s automated validation tool, it will not replace the quality or adequacy of the information submitted which will remain responsibility of duty holders.
How do I register a company to prepare and submit a SCIP notification?
For submitting a SCIP notification, you will need to use a valid ECHA Account. You may consider the following alternatives:
 
1. Create a new ECHA Account as described in the chapter “How to sign-up for the first-time” of the ECHA Accounts manual.
2. Use an existing ECHA Account. If you need to create a separate account for administrative purposes, i.e., create different accounts based on regulatory scope, special attention needs to be considered before you decide using an existing ECHA account and submit notifications to the SCIP database.
 
The roles needed to access the IUCLID Cloud and the ECHA Submission Portal will be given automatically to new users. Existing users need to acquire the user role ‘IUCLID Full Access’ to access the IUCLID Cloud and the user role ‘Submission Portal Manager’ for access to the ECHA Submission Portal.
 
For more information please consult the ECHA Accounts manual. Additional information can also be found in the section ‘Getting access’ of the presentation “SCIP Database notifications – How to prepare and submit a SCIP notification dossier
Can a third party submit a SCIP notification on my behalf?

A third party can create an ECHA account to submit data to the SCIP database on behalf of a duty holder. A link between the third party and the duty holder accounts can be made using the foreign user functionality in ECHA Accounts: the agreement reached between both parties is based on intra-party arrangements.

A foreign user can perform actions on behalf of the company that grants him or her permission to use an account, through an appointment made by the company’s Legal Entity manager, from their own ECHA account. For more information, please consult Q&A 960. Practical details on how to set up a foreign user link can be found in the chapters “User roles” and “How to add a foreign user” of the ECHA Accounts manual.

A foreign user needs to pay special attention to changing to the duty holder account before a notification to the SCIP database is made. 

Duty holders will remain responsible for the notifications submitted to the SCIP database: since a notification must be submitted using the duty holder account, a duty holder can verify at any time the list of notifications submitted to the SCIP database. Duty holders that establish a foreign user link give visibility to the content of their account based on the roles selected. In addition, duty holders can remove the foreign user link at any time.

How do I update a SCIP notification using IUCLID?
You need to:
 
1. Update the information included in your dataset.
2. Validate the updated dataset.
3. Create a new IUCLID dossier. The primary article identifier (type and value) in the dossier needs to remain the same. 
4. Submit the dossier created in step 3. The submission of this dossier via the ECHA Submissions portal will be considered automatically as an update if:
 

a. The submission is made using the same ECHA account; and

b. The same primary article identifier (type and value) is part of your dossier.

What is the article category in the SCIP notification?
The “Article Category” (CN/TARIC code and description) in the SCIP database is the way for duty holders to indicate the function or use of the article as such (with Candidate List substances) or complex object (incorporating such articles) in the SCIP notification from an harmonised list (where the relevant codes and descriptions must be selected). The indentification of the article or complex object based on its function or use cannot be ensured by the ‘article name’ on its own as assigned by the SCIP notification submitter, because it is a text field, can be submitted in other language and not in English, can have a meaningless name for a user of the database, etc…. Furthermore, the ‘article name’ is also used to manage the data in the preparation and submission of notifications in IUCLID and in the ECHA submission portal, which may include a name which may be meaningless for a user of the SCIP database, in particular for consumers and waste operators.     
 
The ‘Article Category’ (CN/TARIC codes and description) is also a key element  to support the identification of impacted waste streams based on function/use of the article or complex object (e.g. textiles, batteries, construction and demolition, electrical and electronic equipment, end of life vehicles, packaging), once it becomes waste.
 
Furthermore, due to reasons to protect commercial interests based on the information submitted to the SCIP database concerning complex objects as placed on the market, the names and identifiers submitted in a SCIP notification are disclosed only for the top level complex object; however, regarding the components and subcomponents only the name and the article category – CN/TARIC codes and descriptions – will be publicly available in the SCIP database, as well as safe use instructions, disassembling instructions and characteristics. This means, for example, that if there is a notification for a bicycle, the information about the bicycle, such as the brand and model, will be published; However, if the bicycle includes two tyres of a certain brand and model, this specific information will not be made available, but the database will indicate that the tyres (identified by the attributed ‘article name’ and ‘article category’) of that bicycle contains a Candidate List substance. It is of the highest importance to submit the appropriate CN/TARIC code and description under the ‘article category’ for the components and subcomponents of complex objects to allow the identification of the articles containing the Candidate List substances.
 
The CN/TARIC codes and descriptions under the ‘article category’ do not have any purpose in the SCIP context linked to the legal purposes of those lists within the scope of Council Regulation (EEC) No 2658/87.
 
The appropriated article category is selected from a set of pre-defined values on a multiselect picklist – the integrated Tariff of the European Union – TARIC – list. This list incorporates the Combined Nomenclature (CN) codes and descriptions as set out in Annex I to Council Regulation (EEC) No 2658/87. Both TARIC and the Combined Nomenclature are managed by the European Commission (DG TAXUD). 
 
The article category is composed of:
Code: Numerical code - CN or TARIC code. The CN code corresponds to a number attributed to each subdivision of the Combined Nomenclature. The TARIC code is based on the Combined Nomenclature, with additional subdivisions.  
Description: CN or TARIC description associated to the CN or TARIC code.
 
The list of CN/TARIC codes and descriptions, also called EU product classification system, consists of three integrated components:
the Harmonized System (HS) which is a nomenclature developed by the World Customs Organization (WCO) comprising many commodity groups, organised in a hierarchical structure by 
- Sections
- chapters (2 digits)
- headings (4 digits)
- sub-headings (6 digits); 
the Combined Nomenclature (CN) - Annex I to Council Regulation (EEC) No 2658/87 – which is the EU's eight-digit (8 digits) coding system, comprising the HS codes with further EU subdivisions. Every year, this Annex I is updated and published as a stand-alone Regulation in the EU's Official Journal, in accordance with Article 12 of Regulation (EEC) No 2658/87, at the latest by 31 October. The updates to the CN list of codes and descriptions is managed by the European Commission (DG TAXUD), as provided in the ‘Code of conduct for the management of the Combined Nomenclature (CN)’;
the Integrated Tariff – TARIC – which comprises the eight-digit code (8 digits) and descriptions of the Combined Nomenclature plus two additional digits (TARIC subheadings with 10 digits). The TARIC database is updated every month.
 
The SCIP format in IUCLID will be only updated once a year in the major IUCLID services release, usually in October of every year. The list of CN/TARIC codes and descriptions included in the SCIP format (https://echa.europa.eu/scip-format) is based on the July update of each year of the TARIC database, from which an extraction is published in 22 EU official languages (on that month of each year), by the European Commission (DG TAXUD) in CIRCABC. The October 2020’s SCIP release will comprise the Combined Nomenclature as updated by Regulation (EU) 2019/1776 and in the October 2021’s SCIP release will comprise the Combined Nomenclature as updated by a Regulation to be published at the latest by 31 October 2020.
 
Due to the large number of entries of the picklist, ECHA strongly recommends duty holders to search for the most appropriate code and description for the article as such or complex object being notified (as well as for components, subcomponents and articles) from the two databases managed and maintained by the European Commission with the CN/TARIC codes and descriptions:
The ‘TARIC database’, monthly extractions published in CIRCABC can be accessed through this webpage by clicking on [Info] under “User Guides, Information and Downloadable data: [Info]”, and on CIRCABC under the folder named ‘Nomenclature’.
The ‘Trade helpdesk’ under ‘Find my product code’ in addition to Annex I to Council Regulation (EEC) No 2658/87
 
Further information:
On the ‘EU product classification system’ is available here
On the Combined Nomenclature (CN) is available here
On TARIC, the integrated Tariff of the European Union, is available here
On IUCLID product, including planned releases, is available here
 
Links:
Consolidated text of 01/01/2020 of Council Regulation (EEC) No 2658/87 of 23 July 1987
Code of conduct for the management of the Combined Nomenclature (CN) – Commission Communication 2000/C 150/03

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