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Toxicological information

Acute Toxicity: inhalation

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
acute toxicity: inhalation
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Acceptable, well-documented publication which meets basic scientific principles
Cross-reference
Reason / purpose:
reference to same study

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
1990
Report Date:
1990

Materials and methods

GLP compliance:
not specified
Limit test:
no

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Details on test material:
No further information available.

Test animals

Species:
rat
Strain:
Sprague-Dawley
Sex:
female

Administration / exposure

Route of administration:
inhalation: vapour
Type of inhalation exposure:
whole body
Vehicle:
other: unchanged (no vehicle)
Details on inhalation exposure:
cf. chapter 7.5.3
Analytical verification of test atmosphere concentrations:
yes
Duration of exposure:
6 - 7 h
Remarks on duration:
per day
Concentrations:
up to max. achievable vapor concentrations at chamber temperature 21-27°C

Results and discussion

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
The vapor pressure of long chain aliphatic alcohols with carbon chain lengths of C5 and more, including 1-nonanol, is too low to reach vapor concentrations that cause toxicity following single or repeated inhalation exposure (6 or 7 h/day, days 1-19 of gestation in combined repeated toxicity/reproduction toxicity study; cf. chapter 7.5.3).
It is concluded that this finding does also apply for structurally similar test substances, isononanol or 3,5,5-trimethylhexan-1-ol.
Executive summary:

There was no inhalation toxicity seen in rats exposed to higher aliphatic alcohols. It was concluded that the vapor pressure of long chain aliphatic alcohols with carbon chain lengths of C5 and more, including 1 -octanol, 1-nonanol, and 1 -decanol, is too low to reach vapor concentrations that cause toxicity following single or repeated inhalation exposure (6 or 7 h/day, days 1-19 of gestation in a combined repeated toxicity/reproduction toxicity study) (Nelson et al., 1990; cf. chapter 7.5.3).