Registration Dossier

Diss Factsheets

Administrative data

Endpoint:
sensitisation data (humans)
Type of information:
other: human case
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
other: not rated
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Only supportive information. No clear conclusions can be drawn from these data.

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Occupational dermatitis following exposure to inorganic selenium compounds.
Author:
Pringle P.
Year:
1942
Bibliographic source:
Br. J. Derm. Syphilis 54, 54-58

Materials and methods

Type of sensitisation studied:
skin
Study type:
case report
Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline followed
Principles of method if other than guideline:
Two cases of accidental dermal exposure to selenous acid are described.
GLP compliance:
no

Test material

Constituent 1
Chemical structure
Reference substance name:
Selenious acid
EC Number:
231-974-7
EC Name:
Selenious acid
Cas Number:
7783-00-8
Molecular formula:
H2O3Se
IUPAC Name:
selenous acid
Details on test material:
- Name of test material (as cited in study report): selenious acid

Method

Type of population:
occupational
Ethical approval:
not specified
Details on study design:
Two cases of accidental dermal exposure to selenious acid are described.
1. A boy, aged 18, who worked on dissolving selenium dioxide in a tank with distilled water, stirring with a stick, noticed that he got a splash of one drop selenious acid on his unprotected forearm while he was mixing. Realizing that it might prove injurious, he carefully wiped it off, but took no further action until 24 hours later when he reported a red patch on his arm at what he described as the exact spot where the splash occurred. It resembled a fresh purpura.

2. A boy, aged 19, also engaged on the mixing process, reported when both his forearms were covered, mostly on the anterior surfaces, with a discrete popular, but occasionally pustular, rash. Under a magnifying glass the spots appeared to be at the opening of the sweat glands or hair follicles. The whole condition had arisen 24 hours. At certain spots there were small shallow ulcers resembling septic burns. He was sure that these were areas he had been splashed on the previous days with selenious acid solution. At no time had he consciously immersed the whole arm in the solution or split the powdered dioxide on it. He had been wearing short rubber gloves reaching to the wrist, at which level the rash abruptly ceased.

Results and discussion

Results of examinations:
1. 24 hours later when he reported a red patch on his arm at what he described as the exact spot where the splash occurred. It resembled a fresh purpura. About half an inch from this patch was a small cluster of minute spots of inflammation around the hair follicles, as though in wiping the splash off he had infected them. The lesions were not raised and were symptomless. Under treatment with calamine lotion the spots slowly turned purple and faded in about ten days, leaving no trace. Under treatment with calamine lotion the spots slowly turned purple and faded in about ten days, leaving no trace.
2. The backs of the hands were slightly oedematous and cracked. There was moderately severe pruritus. Apart from the “burn” areas, the whole picture was not distinguishable from other forms of chemical dermatitis. On the next day, however, the rash had spread, and spots more frankly acneiform were appearing on his face. Thereafter, on the institution of treatment the condition cleared up in about a week.
It was suggested that the rash provoked by selenous acid is the result of a sensitising process. No clear conclusion on sensitising properties can be drawn from these case reports.
According to ATSDR (2003), single topical exposures to selenious acid resulted in purpura, inflammation around hair follicles, and a pustular rash with some ulceration in exposed workers.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
It was suggested that the rash provoked by selenous acid is the result of a sensitising process. No clear conclusion on sensitising properties can be drawn from these case reports. According to ATSDR(2003), single topical exposures to selenious acid resulted in purpura, inflammation around hair follicles, and a pustular rash with some ulceration in exposed workers.

Categories Display