Registration Dossier

Environmental fate & pathways

Adsorption / desorption

Currently viewing:

Administrative data

Link to relevant study record(s)

Reference
Endpoint:
adsorption / desorption: screening
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
guideline study
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 121 (Estimation of the Adsorption Coefficient (Koc) on Soil and on Sewage Sludge using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC))
GLP compliance:
yes (incl. certificate)
Type of method:
HPLC estimation method
Media:
soil
Sample No.:
#1
Type:
Koc
Remarks on result:
not determinable because of methodological limitations
Validity criteria fulfilled:
not specified
Conclusions:
No determination was possible according to Method C.19 Adsorption Coefficient of Commission Regulation (EC) No 440/2008 of 30 May 2008 and Method 121 of the OECD Guidelines for Testing of Chemicals, 22 January 2001, due to the following reason:
An assessment of the test item indicated that it would be positively ionized (protonated amines) across the environmentally relevant pH range. Therefore, it is anticipated that adsorption to the organic carbon content of soils and sediments will not be the dominant mechanism controlling the mobility of the test item in the environment. Adsorption of cationic species occurs primarily by an ion-exchange mechanism and thus depends on the cation-exchange capacity of the soils as well as a variety of other parameters (Boethling, R. S. 1994. Environmental aspects of cationic surfactants. In J. Cross and E. J. and Singer (ed.), Cationic Surfactants: Analytical and Biological Evaluation, vol. 53. Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, USA.). Consequently, the true adsorption coefficient of the test item will be significantly higher than any Koc value determined by the EC C.19 / OECD 121 method and via any computer-based Koc estimation software.
Executive summary:

No determination was possible according to Method C.19 Adsorption Coefficient of Commission Regulation (EC) No 440/2008 of 30 May 2008 and Method 121 of the OECD Guidelines for Testing of Chemicals, 22 January 2001, due to the following reason:

An assessment of the test item indicated that it would be positively ionized (protonated amines) across the environmentally relevant pH range. Therefore, it is anticipated that adsorption to the organic carbon content of soils and sediments will not be the dominant mechanism controlling the mobility of the test item in the environment. Adsorption of cationic species occurs primarily by an ion-exchange mechanism and thus depends on the cation-exchange capacity of the soils as well as a variety of other parameters (Boethling, R. S. 1994. Environmental aspects of cationic surfactants. In J. Cross and E. J. and Singer (ed.), Cationic Surfactants: Analytical and Biological Evaluation, vol. 53. Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, USA.). Consequently, the true adsorption coefficient of the test item will be significantly higher than any Koc value determined by the EC C.19 / OECD 121 method and via any computer-based Koc estimation software

Description of key information

No determination was possible according to Method C.19 Adsorption Coefficient of Commission Regulation (EC) No 440/2008 of 30 May 2008 and Method 121 of the OECD Guidelines for Testing of Chemicals, 22 January 2001, due to the following reason:

An assessment of the test item indicated that it would be positively ionized (protonated amines) across the environmentally relevant pH range. Therefore, it is anticipated that adsorption to the organic carbon content of soils and sediments will not be the dominant mechanism controlling the mobility of the test item in the environment. Adsorption of cationic species occurs primarily by an ion-exchange mechanism and thus depends on the cation-exchange capacity of the soils as well as a variety of other parameters (Boethling, R. S. 1994. Environmental aspects of cationic surfactants. In J. Cross and E. J. and Singer (ed.), Cationic Surfactants: Analytical and Biological Evaluation, vol. 53. Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, USA.). Consequently, the true adsorption coefficient of the test item will be significantly higher than any Koc value determined by the EC C.19 / OECD 121 method and via any computer-based Koc estimation software

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information