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Boiling point

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Endpoint:
boiling point
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
study well documented, meets generally accepted scientific principles, acceptable for assessment
Qualifier:
no guideline available
Principles of method if other than guideline:
As the test material was a thick, viscous liquid, it was not possible to determine the boiling point using a conventional method.

The test material (approximately a 2 cm layer) was placed in a beaker and heated on a hotplate. The temperature was recorded using a thermometer.
GLP compliance:
yes
Type of method:
other: Non-standard method
Key result
Atm. press.:
101.3 kPa
Decomposition:
yes
Decomp. temp.:
210 °C

As the test substance was heated to 160 to 165 °C, small bublles formed and it was observed that the colour of the test substance had lightened. At 190 °C, a white vapour appeared which became a constant stream by 210 °C. The boiling point is therefore reported as the decomposition temperature of 210 °C.

Conclusions:
The test material was found to decompose from 210 °C (483 K) without boiling.
Executive summary:

As the test material was a thick, viscous liquid, it was not possible to determine the boiling point using a conventional method. The test material (approximately a 2 cm layer) was placed in a beaker and heated on a hotplate. The temperature was recorded using a thermometer.

As the test substance was heated to 160 to 165 °C, small bublles formed and it was observed that the colour of the test substance had lightened. At 190 °C, a white vapour appeared which became a constant stream by 210 °C. The boiling point is therefore reported as the decomposition temperature of 210 °C.

The test material was found to decompose from 210 °C (483 K) without boiling.

Endpoint:
boiling point
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
14th January 1993 to 18th May 1994
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
guideline study
Qualifier:
equivalent or similar to guideline
Guideline:
EU Method A.2 (Boiling Temperature)
Deviations:
no
GLP compliance:
no
Type of method:
differential scanning calorimetry
Boiling pt.:
> 149 °C
Atm. press.:
ca. 101.3 kPa
Decomposition:
yes
Decomp. temp.:
>= 320 °C

The boiling point of the test material was determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Two main endothermic transitions were observed in the DSC curve. Two peaks were observed at 231 °C and 342 °C. respectively. Two separate runs were therefore performed with the DSC pans removed from the calorimeter for analysis by FTIR at 220 °C and 320 °C, respectively.

Test conducted at 101.3 kPa. Two endothermic peaks were observed, at 231 and 342 °C.


Samples were examined by FTIR spectroscopy after heating. Material retrieved at 220 °C appeared to be unchanged from the starting material. It was therefore assumed that the first transition was boiling (with an onset temperature of 149 °C). Material retrieved at 320 °C indicated that decomposition had occurred.

Conclusions:
Two endothermic peaks were observed, at 231 and 342 °C. Samples were examined by fourier transform IR spectroscopy after heating. Material retrieved at 220 °C appeared to be unchanged from the starting material. It was therefore assumed that the first transition was boiling (with an onset temperature of 149 °C). Material retrieved at 320 °C indicated that decomposition had occurred.
Executive summary:

The boiling point of the test material was determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Two main endothermic transitions were observed in the DSC curve. Two peaks were observed at 231 °C and 342 °C. respectively. Two separate runs were therefore performed with the DSC pans removed from the calorimeter for analysis by

fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) at 220 °C and 320 °C, respectively.


Samples were examined by FTIR spectroscopy after heating. Material retrieved at 220 °C appeared to be unchanged from the starting material. It was therefore assumed that the first transition was boiling (with an onset temperature of 149 °C). Material retrieved at 320 °C indicated that decomposition had occurred.

Description of key information

The test material was found to decompose before boiling.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information