Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Endpoint:
melting point/freezing point
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
Reported July2003
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
guideline study
Justification for type of information:
It can be seen that there is no signal characteristic of a melting event (an endotherm) below 400°C. At temperatures above 215°C a rapid degradation process was taking place, indicated by the relatively sharp exotherm.

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
study report
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
2003
Report Date:
2003

Materials and methods

Test guidelineopen allclose all
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 102 (Melting point / Melting Range)
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
EU Method A.1 (Melting / Freezing Temperature)
GLP compliance:
yes
Type of method:
differential scanning calorimetry

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Test material form:
solid: particulate/powder
Details on test material:
See individual study reports for purity information and CofA where applicable

Results and discussion

Melting / freezing point
Key result
Decomposition:
yes
Decomp. temp.:
ca. 192 °C
Remarks on result:
not determinable

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
The overall conclusion from this study is that the test item does not melt below 400°C, but which undergoes decomposition from approximately 192°C.
Executive summary:

The melting point of the test substance was determined by Differential Scanning Calorimetry in accordance with EC Directive 92/69/EEC Method Al and OECD Guideline 102 (1995). A Mettler-Toledo DSC821e Differential Scanning Calorimeter.

It can be seen that there is no signal characteristic of a melting event (an endotherm) below 400°C. At temperatures above 215°C (Test 1) a rapid degradation process was taking place, indicated by the relatively sharp exotherm.

The overall conclusion from this study is that the test item does not melt below 400°C, but which undergoes decomposition from approximately 192°C.