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Toxicological information

Sensitisation data (human)

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
sensitisation data (humans)
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Study period:
2002
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
study well documented, meets generally accepted scientific principles, acceptable for assessment

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Sensitization and Desensitization to Allyl Isothiocyanate (Mustard Oil) in the Nasal Cavity
Author:
Gerard Brand and Laurence Jacquot
Year:
2002
Bibliographic source:
Chem. Senses 27: 593–598, 2002

Materials and methods

Type of sensitisation studied:
respiratory
Study type:
study with volunteers
Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline followed
Principles of method if other than guideline:
Sixty subjects participated in the experiment, which employed psychophysical (intensity ratings) and psychophysiological (skin conductance response) measurements. Nasal stimuli were delivered three times with different inter-stimulus intervals.
GLP compliance:
not specified

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Test material form:
liquid

Method

Type of population:
other: students
Ethical approval:
not specified
Subjects:
60 Female volunteer students participated in this experiment. Their ages ranged from 19 to 27 years (mean age 23 years 5 months). All subjects were dextrals, non-smokers and reported normal smell and taste sensitivity.
Clinical history:
None of the subjects had a history of nasal/sinus disease or extensive exposure to chemicals with potential olfactory or trigeminal toxicity.
Route of administration:
inhalation
Details on study design:
The nasal stimulus was allyl isothiocyanate diluted in mineral oil. The concentration used was 25%, in a suprathreshold higher than the standardized detection thresholds (Devos et al., 1990). The nasal stimulus in liquid form was presented in a bottle filled with 4 ml of liquid. The bottle was presented three times to the subject during a limited period of 2 s (one inspiration) at a distance of 1 cm from both nostrils using a holder to avoid any olfactory or thermic interference from the experimenter’s hand.

Results and discussion

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
The results showed that the psychophysical and psychophysiological data were correlated and that the successive nasal stimuli after a short period of time (<2 min) produced increased intensity of irritation, whereas the stimuli delivered after >3 min produced a markedly decreased intensity of irritation. These findings are in agreement with those obtained with capsaicin, the most frequently used irritant molecule.