Registration Dossier

Toxicological information

Direct observations: clinical cases, poisoning incidents and other

Currently viewing:

Administrative data

Endpoint:
direct observations: clinical cases, poisoning incidents and other
Type of information:
other: Observation
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
GDCh/BUA, Advisory Committee on Existing Chemicals of Environmental Relevance, Draft report on TML (tetramethyl lead) and TEL (tetraethyl lead).
Author:
GDCh/BUA
Year:
1995
Bibliographic source:
VCH, PO Box 1011 61, D-6940 Weinheim, Germany

Materials and methods

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent

Results and discussion

Clinical signs:
Acute poisoning in humans The lethal dose of organolead compounds for human beings is not precisely known.  On the basis of sixteen cases, an estimated minimum lethal dose of 15 ml TEL orally, with initial symptoms appearing at 6 ml.  Grandjean gives an LD50 value of 250 mg/kg bodyweight for  TEL in human beings.  Up to 1984, 150 cases of fatal TEL poisoning had been reported.
Cleaning operations on petrol storage tanks frequently give rise to cases of poisoning.  A full review and analysis of such cases is given in the BUA Draft Report. The latency period between acute exposure to TEL and the  appearance of the first symptoms varies from a few hours to  ten days, depending on the severity.  The first signs of  poisoning are generally loss of appetite (anorexia), nausea  and vomiting, sleeplessness, weakness, headache, aggression, depression, irritability, diffuse body aches, tremor,  hyperactivity, exaggerated proprioceptive muscular reflexes, muscular asthenia, difficulty in concentrating and  remembering, confusion, and unusual sensory hallucinations. If larger quantities are absorbed orally, gastro-intestinal  symptoms, such as vomiting, abdominal pain and diarrhoea,  predominate. Hours or even days can pass after the onset of the first  symptoms before the condition of the victim becomes  critical.  Acute psychoses, convulsions, delirium, fever and coma then occur.  Other symptoms such as hypothermia,  hypotonia and bradycardia may also be seen.  The longer the  symptom-free period after acute poisoning lasts, the more  favourable the prognosis.  Even after the most severe  clinical symptoms, virtually complete recovery is possible  within two to six months. A full review of the available data on work on acute  poisoning is contained in the BUA Draft Report on TML and  TEL.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
The lethal dose of organolead compounds for human beings is not precisely known.  On the basis of sixteen cases, an estimated minimum lethal dose of 15 ml TEL orally, with initial symptoms appearing at 6 ml.  Grandjean gives an LD50 value of 250 mg/kg bodyweight for  TEL in human beings.  Up to 1984, 150 cases of fatal TEL poisoning had been reported.
Executive summary:

Acute poisoning in humans

The lethal dose of organolead compounds for human beings is not precisely known.  On the basis of sixteen cases, an estimated minimum lethal dose of 15 ml TEL orally, with initial symptoms appearing at 6 ml.  Grandjean gives an LD50 value of 250 mg/kg bodyweight for 
TEL in human beings.  Up to 1984, 150 cases of fatal TEL poisoning had been reported.


Cleaning operations on petrol storage tanks frequently give rise to cases of poisoning.  A full review and analysis of such cases is given in the BUA Draft Report.

The latency period between acute exposure to TEL and the appearance of the first symptoms varies from a few hours to 
ten days, depending on the severity.  The first signs of poisoning are generally loss of appetite (anorexia), nausea 
and vomiting, sleeplessness, weakness, headache, aggression, depression, irritability, diffuse body aches, tremor, 
hyperactivity, exaggerated proprioceptive muscular reflexes, muscular asthenia, difficulty in concentrating and 
remembering, confusion, and unusual sensory hallucinations.

If larger quantities are absorbed orally, gastro-intestinal  symptoms, such as vomiting, abdominal pain and diarrhoea, predominate.

Hours or even days can pass after the onset of the first  symptoms before the condition of the victim becomes 
critical.  Acute psychoses, convulsions, delirium, fever and coma then occur.  Other symptoms such as hypothermia, 
hypotonia and bradycardia may also be seen.  The longer the symptom-free period after acute poisoning lasts, the more 
favourable the prognosis.  Even after the most severe clinical symptoms, virtually complete recovery is possible 
within two to six months.

A full review of the available data on work on acute poisoning is contained in the BUA Draft Report on TML and  TEL.