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Environmental fate & pathways

Biodegradation in water and sediment: simulation tests

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Description of key information

TEL degrades rapidly in the atmosphere. Based on the vapour pressure and low water solubility, atmospheric degradation is expected to be the main distribution route of tetraethyl lead. Hydrolysis data (Harrison et aI., 1986) and available degradation studies indicate that TEL is not persistent in water, decomposing by both biotic and abiotic pathways to form ethyl lead salts (half-life=2-5 days) and ultimately inorganic lead. Further information on sediments indicates that TEL undergoes a similar stepwise degradation in sediment to form inorganic lead. Available data show that TEL is unstable in soils and undergoes complete decomposition within 14 days.
Further information on sediments indicates that TEL undergoes a similar stepwise degradation in sediment to form inorganic lead. Available data show that TEL is unstable in soils and undergoes complete decomposition within 14 days.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information

TEL degrades rapidly in the atmosphere. Based on the vapour pressure and low water solubility, atmospheric degradation is expected to be the main distribution route of tetraethyl lead. Hydrolysis data (Harrison et aI., 1986) and available degradation studies indicate that TEL is not persistent in water, decomposing by both biotic and abiotic pathways to form ethyl lead salts (half-life=2-5 days) and ultimately inorganic lead. Further information on sediments indicates that TEL undergoes a similar stepwise degradation in sediment to form inorganic lead. Available data show that TEL is unstable in soils and undergoes complete decomposition within 14 days.