Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Hazard for aquatic organisms

Freshwater

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Marine water

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

STP

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Sediment (freshwater)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Sediment (marine water)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for air

Air

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for terrestrial organisms

Soil

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for predators

Secondary poisoning

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no potential for bioaccumulation

Additional information

Conclusion on classification

The standard approach for classifying poorly soluble metals is to use the data generated from transformation / dissolution (T/D) tests, and compare this with relevant acute or chronic Ecotoxicity Reference Values (ERV) for the soluble metal compounds (Guidance on the Application of the CLP Criteria, ECHA 2017).

The T/D test for bismuth silicate has revealed that bismuth is released in test medium at pH 6 and at pH 8 in small amounts (3.32 and 3.77 µg Bi/L, respectively) (Martinez 2016a).

According to the guidance on CLP criteria (ECHA 2017) the acute and chronic hazard should be assessed for a metal compound if the respective acute or chronic ERV value for the metal ion of concern is ≤1 mg/L. A metal should be classified for acute aquatic hazard if the dissolved metal ion concentration after a period of 7 days at a loading rate of 1 mg/L exceeds the acute ERV. Where the chronic ERV for the metal ions of concern is ≤ 1 mg/L, the 28-day results from the T/D test should be used to aid classification. As the acute and chronic ERV values for bismuth are >1 mg/L [1], bismuth does not need to be taken into account in the classification for environmental hazard. The acute and chronic ERVs are far higher than the concentrations of bismuth released from bismuth silicate in T/D tests. Therefore, bismuth silicate does not need to be classified for environmental hazard.

 [1] Based on data available on ECHA dissemination portal, accessed 25 November 2016