Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Hazard for aquatic organisms

Hazard for air

Hazard for terrestrial organisms

Hazard for predators

Additional information

Conclusion on classification

Classification was done according to the criteria described in the CLP regulation EC No 1272/2008, version 2016.

Acute aquatic hazard:

For classification acute toxicity data are available for aquatic invertebrates (Daphnia) and algae:

Daphnia: EC50 (48h) = > 100 mg/L

Algae: ErC50 (72h) = 238 mg/L

Based on the fact that all LC50 or EC50 value were observed to be > 100 mg/L and according to Table 4.1.0 (a), the substance should not be classified for acute aquatic hazard, as the lowest LC/EC50 value is larger than the cut-off for classification of 1 mg/L.

Chronic aquatic hazard

For chronic classification, there are only chronic data available for one trophic level, algae. As described in Figure 4.1.1 in the CLP regulation (EC No 1272/2008, version 2016), the most stringent outcome of classification according to Table 4.1.0 (b) (ii) or (ii) and (iii) should be used.

Table 4.1.0 (b) (ii):

The substance is readily biodegradable, hence Table 4.1.0 (b) (ii) applies.

The 72h EC10 value for algae was 55.7 mg/L. Therefore, the substance should not be classified for chronic aquatic hazard.

Table 4.1.0 (b) (iii):

The substance is readily biodegradable, the log Kow is 1.80, and the acute toxicity values (LC/EC50) are all above 100 mg/L. Therefore the substance does not meet the criteria for classification for chronic aquatic hazard.

Most stringent classification:

The conclusion of both assessment is that the substance should not be classified for either acute or chronic aquatic toxicity.