Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Hazard for aquatic organisms

Hazard for air

Hazard for terrestrial organisms

Hazard for predators

Additional information

Conclusion on classification

The acute Daphnia EC50 for the substance is predicted to be 5.6 mg/L. The acute algae ErC50 is predicted to be 6.8 mg/L.

Since the acute L(E)C50 values are > 1 mg/L, the substance does not need to be classified for acute toxicity according to Regulation 1272/2008/EC (CLP; Table 4.1.0; a).

The only available chronic value is the predicted EC10/NOEC (growth rate) of algae being 2.3 mg/L. According to CLP Figure 4.1.1, the chronic classification has to be determined based on this chronic value according to Table 4.1.0, (b) i (as the substance is not readily biodegradable) and based on the available EC50 value for Daphnia and environmental fate data according to Table 4.1.0, (b) iii. The most stringent outcome should be leading. As the NOEC (growth rate) is > 1 mg/L, the substance does not need to be classified for chronic toxicity based on this available chronic value. However, based on the fact that the substance is not readily biodegradable (despite the log Kow of 3.6) and the EC50 value for Daphnia is > 1 - ≤ 10 mg/L (5.6 mg/L), the substance needs to be classified as Chronic Cat. 2, H411 according to Table 4.1.0, (b) iii, which is the most stringent outcome.

Overall, it can be concluded that the substance needs to be classified for environmental hazards as Chronic Cat. 2, H411 according to Regulation 1272/2008/EC and its amendments.

(As the acute L(E)C50 values are >1 but ≤ 10 mg/L, the substance additionally needs to be classified as Acute Cat. 2 (H401) according to GHS).