Registration Dossier

Diss Factsheets

Environmental fate & pathways

Endpoint summary

Administrative data

Description of key information

Biodegradation in water

Biodegradability of aluminum trioctadecanoate (CAS no. 637 -12 -7) is predicted using QSAR toolbox version 3.3 with logKow as the primary descriptor (2017). Test substance undergoes 76.75% degradation by CO2 evolution parameter in 28 days. Thus, based on percentage degradation, the test chemical aluminum trioctadecanoate was estimated to be readily biodegradable in water.

Biodegradation in water and sediment

Estimation Programs Interface (EPI Suite, 2017) prediction model was run to predict the half-life in water and sediment for the test compound aluminum trioctadecanoate (CAS No. 637 -12 -7). If released in to the environment, 12.8% of the chemical will partition into water according to the Mackay fugacity model level III and the half-life period of aluminum trioctadecanoate in water is estimated to be 60 days (1440 hrs). The half-life (60 days estimated by EPI suite) indicates that the chemical is persistent in water and the exposure risk to aquatic animals is moderate to high whereas the half-life period of aluminum trioctadecanoate in sediment is estimated to be 541.66 days (13000 hrs). However, as the percentage release of test chemical aluminum trioctadecanoatei into the sediment is less than 1% (i.e, reported as 0.00000000418%), indicating that the chemical aluminum trioctadecanoate is not persistent in sediment.

Biodegradation in soil

The half-life period of aluminum trioctadecanoate (CAS No. 637 -12 -7) in soil was estimated using Level III Fugacity Model by EPI Suite version 4.1 estimation database (EPI suite, 2017). If released into the environment, 87.1% of the chemical will partition into soil according to the Mackay fugacity model level III. The half-life period of aluminum trioctadecanoate in soil is estimated to be 120 days (2880 hrs). Based on this half-life value of aluminum trioctadecanoate, it is concluded that the chemical is not persistent in the soil environment and the exposure risk to soil dwelling animals is moderate to low.

Additional information

Biodegradation in water

1 predicted data for the target compound aluminum trioctadecanoate (CAS no. 637-12-7) and the total 4 weight of evidence studies (2 from peer reviewed journal and 2 from authoritative database) for its closest read across substance with logKow as the primary descriptor were reviewed for the biodegradation end point which are summarized as below:

 

In a predicted data done by SSS (2017) using QSAR toolbox version 3.3 with logKow as the primary descriptor, percentage biodegradability of test chemical aluminum trioctadecanoate (CAS no. 637 -12 -7) was estimated.Test substance undergoes 76.75% degradation by CO2 evolution parameter in 28 days. Thus, based on percentage degradation, the test chemical aluminum trioctadecanoate was estimated to be readily biodegradable in water.

 

In a weight of evidence study from peer reviewed journal (Chemosphere, 1987) for read across substancecalcium stearate(CAS no. 1592-23-0),biodegradability of calcium stearate was assessed by OECD 301B guideline also known as Sturm test. Installations and equipment used in the test were as described in the OECD Guideline 301B. The size of the carbosys was reduced from 5 l to 3l and the volume of the solution from 2 to 1.5 l. A magnetic stirrer with a PTFE – coated rod of 6 cm length rotating at approximately 60 rpm was used for agitation. A constant temperature of 23°C was maintained by immersion of carbosys in a water bath. Sludge for the preparation of the inoculum was taken from a sewage treatment plant receiving predominantly domestic waste. The inoculum and the mineral solutions were prepared according to the OECD 301 guidelines.

In the method with direct dispersion of the test chemical, calcium stearate (20mg/l) was added as a powder or as a suspension in water prepared by ultrasonic dispersion, to the carbosys containing the inoculum. No additional treatment was given to the mixture containing the inoculum. In the method with solid carriers the samples were prepared by melting calcium stearate on glass filter papers. The glass filter papers were cut into small pieces before putting them into carbosys. The test chemical was biodegraded under all test conditions, fulfilling the strict criteria of ready biodegradability [60% within 10 days] except in one case where it was applied on a glass filter in a non-agitated container. The solubility of 2mg/l water was apparently sufficient to ensure the continuous availability of the test chemical to the bacteria. The decreased rate of biodegradation of the sample melted on the glass filter can be explained by a reduction in the availability of calcium stearate as a consequence of the melting operation [glazing of the surface] and the absence of agitation. The percentage degradation of test substance was determined to be 91% degradation by CO2 evolution parameterin 24 days in absence of agitation and glass filter paper was not used as a carried, whereas 99% degradation was observed by CO2 evolution parameter in 24 days in absence of agitation and 55 and 88% degradation was observed by CO2 evolution parameter in 24 days when glass filter papers was used as a carrier. In addition to this, test substance also undergoe degradation upto 72% and 84% in 20 days by CO2 evolution parameter using glass filter papers and ultrasound as a carrier and in presence of agitation. Thus, based percentage degradation, Calcium stearate was considered to be readily biodegradable in water.

 

Another supporting weight of evidence study of biodegradation for read across substancecalcium stearate(CAS no. 1592-23-0)was assessed by OECD 301C guideline also known as MITI test(Chemosphere, 1987). The test was carried out at 22±3°C in a HACH manometric respirometer according to OECD 301 C guidelines. The mineral solution was prepared according to the guidelines. Sludges for the preparation of the inoculum were obtained from domestic sewage treatment works, washed twice by centrifugation and resuspension in the test medium. These sludges were dispersed in the test medium to give a final activated sludge concentration of 30mg/l. Prior to the start of the test the bottles were incubated for 1 week at the test temperature to reduce the endogenous rate of the inoculum. The test chemical was added to the bottles to give a final concentration of 100mg/l Nonyphenol was used as an emulsifier. Blank tests were set up with the emulsifiers at the concentration used to correct the oxygen uptake. The test chemical is readily biodegradable under all test conditions, fulfilling the strict criterion of biodegradation [60% degradation in 10 days]. The percentage degradation of test substance was determined to be 91% degradation by BOD and ThOD parameterin 32 days. Thus, based on percentage degradation, Calcium stearate was considered to be readily biodegradable in nature.

 

In an additional study for the same read across substance calcium stearate(CAS no. 1592-23-0), biodegradation experiment was conducted for 28 days for evaluating the percentage biodegradability of test substance Calcium stearate (GSBL database, 2016). The study was performed according OECD Guideline 301 D (Ready Biodegradability: Closed Bottle Test).The percentage degradation of test substance was determined to be 95% degradation by ThOD or COD parameter in 28 days. Thus, based on percentage degradation, Calcium stearate was considered to be readily biodegradable in nature.

 

For read across substance Lead distearate (CAS no. 1072 -35 -1), biodegradation study was conducted for 14 days for evaluating the percentage biodegradability of substance Lead distearate (J-CHECK, 2016). Concentration of inoculum i.e, activated sludge used was 30 mg/l and initial test substance conc. used in the study was 100 mg/l, respectively. When the test substance was esterified and a GC analysis was performed, the results contained Lead distearate and substances with fewer number of carbons, namely, Lead dipalmitate and Lead myristate. Degree of degradation of each substance was found to be Lead dipalmitate: 59.5%, Lead myristate: 67.7%. The percentage degradation of read across substance was determined to be 32.9 and 49.1% by BOD and GC parameter in 14 days. Thus, based on percentage degradation, Lead distearate is considered to be readily biodegradable in nature.

 

On the basis of above results for target chemicalaluminum trioctadecanoate (from OECD QSAR toolbox version 3.3) and for its read across substance (from peer reviewed journal and authoritative database J-CHECK and GSBL, 2016), it can be concluded that the test substance aluminum trioctadecanoate can be expected to be readily biodegradable in nature.

Biodegradation in water and sediment

Estimation Programs Interface (EPI Suite, 2017) prediction model was run to predict the half-life in water and sediment for the test compound aluminum trioctadecanoate (CAS No. 637 -12 -7). If released in to the environment, 12.8% of the chemical will partition into water according to the Mackay fugacity model level III and the half-life period of aluminum trioctadecanoate in water is estimated to be 60 days (1440 hrs). The half-life (60 days estimated by EPI suite) indicates that the chemical is persistent in water and the exposure risk to aquatic animals is moderate to high whereas the half-life period of aluminum trioctadecanoate in sediment is estimated to be 541.66 days (13000 hrs). However, as the percentage release of test chemical aluminum trioctadecanoatei into the sediment is less than 1% (i.e, reported as 0.00000000418%), indicating that the chemical aluminum trioctadecanoate is not persistent in sediment.

Biodegradation in soil

The half-life period of aluminum trioctadecanoate (CAS No. 637 -12 -7) in soil was estimated using Level III Fugacity Model by EPI Suite version 4.1 estimation database (EPI suite, 2017). If released into the environment, 87.1% of the chemical will partition into soil according to the Mackay fugacity model level III. The half-life period of aluminum trioctadecanoate in soil is estimated to be 120 days (2880 hrs). Based on this half-life value of aluminum trioctadecanoate, it is concluded that the chemical is not persistent in the soil environment and the exposure risk to soil dwelling animals is moderate to low.

On the basis of available information, the test substance aluminum trioctadecanoate can be considered to be readily biodegradable in nature.