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Ecotoxicological information

Short-term toxicity to fish

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Description of key information

According to REACH Annex VIII, 9.1.3., column 2, a short-term toxicity study on fish does not need to be conducted if there are mitigating factors indicating that aquatic toxicity is unlikely to occur. This applies for L-glutamine, as no toxicity at the limit concentration was observed in acute toxicity studies with daphnia (according to OECD202) and algae (according to OECD201) indicating that the substance has a very low / no hazard potential for aquatic organisms. Further, as the substance (in protein) is a basic component of fish food it is very unlikely that fish in an OECD203 study exposed to limit concentrations (100 mg/l) of L-glutamine show any adverse effect. Therefore and for animal welfare reasons short-term toxicity study on fish was not conducted for the substance L-glutamine.

The toxicity of L-glutamine to fish was predicted by calculation (PNN model). The LC50 was predicted to be ca. 951.5 mg/L.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

LC50 for freshwater fish:
951.5 mg/L
LC50 for marine water fish:
951.5 mg/L

Additional information

No experimental data for L-glutamine with regard to fish toxicity is available.

No toxicity at the limit concentration was observed in acute toxicity studies with daphnia (according to OECD202) and algae (according to OECD201) indicating that the substance has a very low / no hazard potential for aquatic organisms. Further, as the substance (in protein) is a basic component of fish food it is very unlikely that fish in an OECD203 study exposed to limit concentrations (100 mg/l) of L-glutamine show any adverse effect. Therefore and for animal welfare reasons is seems sufficient to use a LC50 value predicted by calculation, available in a database for the purpose of CSA.

The toxicity of L-glutamine to fish was predicted by calculation (PNN model). The LC50 was predicted to be ca. 951.5 mg/L. (Ecological Categorization Results from the Canadian Domestic Substance List, 2013).