Registration Dossier

Diss Factsheets

Administrative data

Hazard for aquatic organisms

Freshwater

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC aqua (freshwater)
PNEC value:
1.1 µg/L
Assessment factor:
10
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor
PNEC freshwater (intermittent releases):
0.224 mg/L

Marine water

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC aqua (marine water)
PNEC value:
1.1 µg/L
Assessment factor:
10
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor
PNEC marine water (intermittent releases):
0.224 mg/L

STP

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC STP
PNEC value:
3.6 mg/L
Assessment factor:
10
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor

Sediment (freshwater)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC sediment (freshwater)
PNEC value:
5 mg/kg sediment dw
Assessment factor:
10
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor

Sediment (marine water)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC sediment (marine water)
PNEC value:
5 mg/kg sediment dw
Assessment factor:
10
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor

Hazard for air

Air

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for terrestrial organisms

Soil

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC soil
PNEC value:
0.58 mg/kg soil dw
Assessment factor:
10
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor

Hazard for predators

Secondary poisoning

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC oral
PNEC value:
11.1 mg/kg food
Assessment factor:
90

Additional information

Anthracene oil (benzo[a]pyrene < 50 ppm, AOL) is a UVCB substance consisting of a complex and within limits variable combination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The substance is obtained by distillation from coal tar extracting the approximate distillation range from ca. 300 °C to 400 °C. This distillation interval largely excludes low molecular aromatic hydrocarbons (one and to some extent two-ring aromatics) as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons composed of more than four to five rings depending on the respective boiling points of the individual aromatic substances. Thus, AOL contains mainly three-ring aromatic compounds and to a lesser extent PAHs with four rings (see Chapter 1.). Two-ring aromatics are minor. In combination, these substances will constitute the environmental toxic effects of AOL.

Major constituent of AOL is phenanthrene. It is present in AOL in concentrations up to 31 % (average 28 %). Other PAH contribute percentages equal or lower than approx. 6 to 7 %. Amongst the PAH present in AOL, phenanthrene is one with the most pronounced toxicity to environmental organisms. Some individual PAH may have a somewhat higher toxicity compared to phenanthrene, but this is counter-balanced by the much higher concentration of phenanthrene in AOL. Overall, the ecotoxicological potential of phenanthrene is considered to be representative of total AOL integrating the toxic effects of all its other PAH constituents. Thus, phenanthrene can be used as substitute and marker substance to characterise the ecological toxicity of total AOL.

Environmental risk assessment is based on predicted no-effect-levels (PNECs) derived for the substance under consideration. As phenanthrene is established as marker substance for AOL, PNECs are deduced employing environmental toxicity data of phenanthrene. These PNECs are also representative of total AOL as explained above.

PNECs are derived by following the rules laid down in ECHA Guidance on information requirements and chemical safety assessment - Chapter R.10: Characterisation of dose [concentration]-response for environment (May 2018).

Conclusion on classification

For anthracene oil (AOL), aquatic long-term toxicity data are not available. Based on acute toxicity data (the lowest EL50 (growth rate) is 25 mg/L), AOL requires classification for aquatic environmental hazard:

According to Annex I, Table 4.1.0 (b) (iii) of Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 (CLP regulation) as amended by Regulation (EC) No 286/2011, AOL is self-classified by the registrant as Category Aquatic Chronic 3 combined with the hazard statement H412: Harmful to aquatic life with long lasting effects.